No euphemisms for school’s protectors

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionStop calling security people at schools “school resource officers.” Start calling them cops, law enforcement, security guards.Forget the touchy-feely job titles for people who are meant to protect us.Touchy-feely gets kids killed.Edmond DayRotterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsCar hits garage in Rotterdam Sunday morning; Garage, car burnEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

Make ‘Hamilton’ more available to residents

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionWhen I found out that “Hamilton” was making an appearance at Proctors, I was ecstatic. My friends and I spent hours and hours talking about it, remembering the countless hours we spent screaming the lyrics to all 46 songs and watching fan videos about the musical itself.After reading the March 4 article in The Daily Gazette, I’m full of disappointment.Now let me be blunt: The good thing is that “Hamilton” is coming to Proctors in Schenectady. The bad thing is that the majority of the residents, certainly the students, in Schenectady won’t be able to afford tickets or have access to them. Our families can’t buy a season subscription.Is there any chance, Mr. Philip Morris, that a block of tickets could be available for students?Leah RussoSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%Schenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashTroopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashlast_img read more

GUEST COLUMN: King’s forgotten legacy? The fight for economic justice

first_imgWe know him as a civil rights advocate, but he also waged a lifelong struggle for economic justice and the empowerment of poor and working-class people of all colors.Beyond his dream of civil rights lay a demand that every person have the right to vote, adequate food, education, a decent job and income and housing. In the months before he traveled to Memphis in 1968 to participate in a garbage-workers’ strike and was assassinated, King had been crisscrossing the country for weeks, promoting a multi-racial coalition to pressure Congress to reallocate money from the Vietnam War to money for human needs.In a speech dated March 10, 1968, which took place in New York City, King said:“One America is flowing with the milk of prosperity and honey of equality and that America is the habitat of millions of people who have food and materials necessities for their bodies, culture and education for their minds, freedom and human dignity for their spirits.“But as painfully aware of the fact that there is another America, and that other America has daily ugliness about it that transforms the buoyancy of hope with the fatigue of despair” King called it the “Poor People’s Campaign,” and it promoted an “economic bill of rights for all Americans,” which included five pillars: a meaningful job at a living wage; a secure and adequate  income; access to land; access to capital, especially for poor people and minorities; and the ability for ordinary people to “play a truly significant role” in the government. In 2020, when “everything decent and fair in American life” is under threat, as King also said it was during his time, we might do well to remember his fight for economic justice as part of King’s dream for a better America that was all encompassing.  Categories: Editorial, OpinionFor The Daily GazetteEach January, the Schenectady County Human Rights Commission’s MLK Coalition and all Americans join together to honor the birthday of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, Jr.In 2018, marked the 50th anniversary of that tragic day on which Dr. King’s life was taken, making this a fitting opportunity as we are in a new decade and our in critical times in our nation to reflect upon some of the most important principles that Dr. King fought for-those of liberty, peace, equality and justice for all. Last year marked the 90th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who was born on Jan. 15, 1929.Dr. King was dedicated to achieving his vision of civil rights for all people and his voice and words were heard by millions across our great nation and the world. He was committed to human rights, civil rights and social justice and had a determination to follow a course of social change through non-violent means and which cost him his life for us to have the human rights and civil rights we have in America today. The King we rarely talk about fought to remake America’s political and economic system from the ground up.Fifty years after he was assassinated in Memphis and celebrating his 90th birthday, I pose a question to you: How should we remember Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.? Dr. King has been primarily positively portrayed through his magnificent “I Have a Dream” speech, delivered before the Lincoln Memorial in 1963.King called on America to live up to its historic ideals of equal rights, in which all people would be defined by the “content of their character” and not the color of their skin. One major failing in how we remember King is our typing of him as a civil rights leader, the activist and pastor. However, we do not type him as a Baptist pastor, preacher, theologian and scholar.But King offered just such an analysis.center_img Remembering King’s unfinished fight for economic justice, broadly conceived, might help us to better understand the relevance of his legacy to us today.It might help us to realize that King’s moral discourse about the gap between the “haves and the have-nots” resulted from his role in the labor movement as well as in the civil rights movement. The nation may honor him now, but we should also remember the right-wing crusade against him in his own time as he sought just alternatives to America’s exploitative racial capitalism. How we remember King matters.It helps us to see where we have been and to understand King’s unfinished agenda for our own times and generations to come. Ang A. Morris is executive director of the Schenectady County Human Rights Commission.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: No more extensions on vehicle inspectionsHIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right wayEDITORIAL: No chickens in city without strong regslast_img read more

Cumbria

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Dublin down

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

City centre offices Creating a balance

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Lynton ponders investor offer

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

South Korea’s president calls for ‘all possible measures’ to help virus-hit economy

first_imgSouth Korea President Moon Jae-in said on Tuesday the government should make an all-out effort to boost the economy as it comes under pressure from a coronavirus outbreak.”(The government) shouldn’t quibble over whether anything is unprecedented or not, rather, we should take every possible measure we can think of on the table to deploy them,” Moon said in a cabinet meeting.Moon said the economy is in an emergency situation and needs a boost to stimulate domestic demand.In 2015, South Korea drew up a supplementary budget to help cushion the economy from the effects of an outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS).Topics :last_img read more

Bank Indonesia to standardize financial service providers competency

first_imgShe said that the standardization must be applied to every level of banking and financial service employees, starting from tellers, supervisors to managers.Read also: Hackathon to identify digital talents for banking industry“We have a poor experience in banking operational governance that affects our financial system,” she said. “We don’t want any recurring mistakes that is why we need to have standardized competency.”Ida hoped that Bank Indonesia would help accelerate the standardization process by allowing the internship program to be held in all national banks. She also said that the ministry had established training centers (BLK) which would also train bankers to achieve the standards. Bank Indonesia Governor Perry Warjiyo said that the standardization is needed to keep up with the rapid development of technological advances and various products in financial services. “We will continue our collaboration with the Manpower Ministry and BNSP to standardize financial technology and train entrepreneurial skills from micro to small and medium enterprises,” he told The Jakarta Post.He went on to say that the standardization was part of the central bank’s basic support in moving towards a highly digitalized payment system. Perry added that in the next four years, the central bank plans to do more standardization to create an efficient financial service system.Topics : The central bank, Manpower Ministry and National Profession Standardization Agency (BNSP) have signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to standardize competencies for financial service providers to improve Indonesian talent within the sector.Manpower Minister Ida Fauziah said that the standards would be built upon the existing Indonesian National Work Competency Standards (SKKNI) for the banking industry which was established in 2017. She asked bankers to adhere to the standards. “Human resources in the banking and financial industry need to have technical and managerial capabilities in applying the banking business principles,” she said during her keynote speech at the MOU signing ceremony on Monday.last_img read more

Hundreds attend ordination Mass in East Nusa Tenggara despite COVID-19 warnings

first_imgDespite requests to cancel an ordination Mass for Siprianus Hormat, who was named the new bishop of Ruteng, following restrictions on mass gatherings amid the COVID-19 outbreak, organizers pressed ahead with the event in Ruteng district, Manggarai regency, East Nusa Tenggara, that was attended by hundreds of people on Thursday.The ordination Mass began at 9 a.m. at the Ruteng Cathedral on Thursday.Manggarai regent Deno Kamelus argued that the event was held under tight health screening with organizers providing hand sanitizer and checking the body temperatures of churchgoers before they entered the premise. He said around 1,500 people attended the event on Thursday. “The visitors accounted for only 1 percent of the population of Manggarai Raya. The Manggarai regency administration and the organizers followed the protocols set by the central government,” he told The Jakarta Post.He added that the administration would follow the policies set by the central government to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.Siprianus was ordained to lead the Catholic congregations in Manggarai Raya, which comprises Manggarai, East Manggarai and West Manggarai regencies.The administration decided to go ahead with the event, as it was scheduled months ago, Deno said. “The administration and the organizers are also closely monitoring churchgoers from outside Manggarai while they are in Ruteng,” he added.Previously, the head of the COVID-19 rapid-response team, Doni Monardo, had asked the Ruteng Archdiocese to postpone the ordination Mass to prevent spreading COVID-19.”We beg you to postpone the event on behalf of humanity,” he said in a letter sent to the cardinal and Manggarai regent as quoted from Kompas.com.Doni expressed his concern that COVID-19 carriers could potentially transmit the virus to the elderly and the sick, who are especially vulnerable to the disease.Indonesia has recorded 227 confirmed COVID-19 cases in 13 provinces with 19 fatalities. (trn)Topics :last_img read more