New Mini-Documentary Gives Inside Look At The Sober Community Within The Jam Scene [Watch]

first_imgIt was the late, great writer Hunter Thompson who was famously quoted as saying, “I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they’ve always worked for me.”Such an affirmatively questionable view on some of this world’s most dangerous (but sometimes fun) vices could easily be applicable for the jam scene, where drugs and alcohol flow just as freely through concert parking lots as LSD-inspired notes out of Jerry Garcia‘s guitar. Accepted use of booze and illegal drugs within the jam scene has been one of those unwritten rules by of the musical subculture ever since the Grateful Dead began their career as the house band for Ken Kesey‘s Acid Test parties in the mid-1960s.While drugs continue to be an openly controversial topic of discussion in the jam scene and the culture at large, there are some music fans who don’t feel the need to partake in illicit activities during shows. The experience of seeing shows, especially heady jam-friendly ones, can be just as fulfilling sober as they are with a few added substances.A new mini-documentary titled Sober Jam Band Scene recently uploaded YouTube by Mary Gray Johnson shows viewers into the lives of music fans (primarily Phish fans) who follow the sober path when attending shows. The short, 10-minute film features a mix of real-fan interviews in which they discuss their love for Phish and acknowledge the existence of drug use throughout their scene. One interviewee named Carolina D. states that jam shows can be, “kind of like Disneyland for drunks and addicts.”However, the film shows viewers a side of the jam scene that doesn’t partake in such vices. You’ve probably seen them at shows, where sober fans gather under yellow balloons to connect and help each other enjoy the music and the scene they love without succumbing to its myriad temptations. From The Wharf Rats on Grateful Dead tour to The Phellowship at Phish shows to Much Obliged at Umphrey’s McGee and The Jellyfish at The String Cheese Incident, these yellow balloon groups hold 12 Step meetings at set breaks and help sober fans continue to appreciate live music without the substance-based pitfalls that often come with it.The documentary clearly struck a power chord with viewers, as the video’s comment section includes notes shared by other sober folks, stating, “I have only seen Phish sober, 57 shows so far! Best time EVER!,” “My ‘drug’ is the combination of getting lost in the music and dancing. That is all I need,” and “You did an awesome job capturing the essence of this scene. Sober Rat & Phell since ’95! Much Love!”Fans can watch the entire documentary in the video below.Sober Jam Band Scene[Video: Mary Gray Johnson]Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio recently spoke of his own sobriety strategies in an interview with GQ. The Grateful Dead‘s current audio archivist, David Lemieux, has also admitted in the past that he mostly refrained from using psychedelic drugs during the Dead shows he attended as a “taper” over the years.“I saw the Dead over 100 times and the bulk of those shows were sober,” Lemieux said in a 2017 interview. “I enjoyed the heck out of them. In fact, a lot of those shows are the ones that I can right now look back on 25-30 years [later] and have better memories of those because I could be more focused on it. I could be more in the moment of what was going on, as opposed to having this  mind-expanding moment.”[H/T r/phish]last_img read more

Growing HDS initiative builds toward peace

first_img Read Full Story What led rival youth militia leaders to come together as peacebuilding partners? How do you negotiate peace when religious identities are at stake? What are Muslim experiences of conflict and peace and how do they mirror those of other communities?These are difficult questions with complex answers, but they highlight how Harvard Divinity School is enabling peacebuilding through the growing Religions and the Practice of Peace Initiative, which is holding its first public colloquium series this academic year.“We find ourselves at a pivotal moment in history, when violent conflict is taking a tragic and unacceptable toll on individuals, families, and communities around the world, and humanity is facing problems on an unprecedented scale that will require an extraordinary level of human cooperation to surmount,” said HDS Dean David N. Hempton.“Since religion remains a vital and integral force in the lives of most societies across the globe, it is absolutely crucial that we better understand the powerful roles that religious communities have played and can play, not only in fomenting violence, but also in healing and reconciliation. Here at HDS, given our faculty’s deep expertise in the study of religion, theology, and ministry, we are looking to serve, through the RPP Initiative, as a hub for cross-disciplinary, University-wide engagement, scholarship, and practice in peacebuilding.”The RPP Initiative has grown from an idea to a robust effort that has hosted more than a dozen programs and convenes a working group of students, scholars, and practitioners from across Harvard and beyond.last_img read more

Fresh thinking on history of feminism

first_imgFor many, feminism just took a flying, sword-wielding leap with “Wonder Woman,” the new film in which Amazonian warrior-princess Diana of Themyscira serves as protector of the free world. The Patty Jenkins-directed movie, the first superhero feature with a woman in the leading role, grossed $223 million worldwide in its opening weekend, the third-biggest launch for a DC Comics movie.Though an important milestone for some, others consider the film just one more step on the long, complicated road to gender equality, a road Harvard cultural historian Phyllis Thompson and her class of undergraduates explored during the spring term.Thompson’s class “The History of Feminism: Narratives of Gender, Race and Rights,” a new Harvard offering that examined the evolution of major feminist narratives, aimed to replace the notion of a steady stream of progress with a more nuanced appreciation of the many actors, seen and unseen, responsible for advancing women’s rights over time.“There have been extraordinary thinkers from many places and many intellectual orientations and a broad variety of racial backgrounds who have had extremely progressive ideas ahead of their time,” said Thompson, a lecturer in studies of women, gender, and sexuality. “And if we periodize the history of feminism strictly along a chronological basis it’s really easy to lose track of that.”To help students dig into history and develop a more “honest appreciation for the past,” Thompson structured her course around four themes: the fight for political and economic citizenship; the regulation of family and domestic life; the struggle for the freedom of sexual expression and reproduction and identity politics; and the significance of utopian visions, idealism, and manifestos.“My thinking was that each time the students would go through the history from a different approach they would be forced to wrestle with what they knew, what they didn’t know, what the real genealogy is for any particular person or action,” said Thompson.Despite disrupting the “progress narrative,” the class put chronology at the center of one important assignment, a timeline designed to illuminate understudied facets of feminism. The online record created by students starts in the fourth century B.C. with Agnodice, the first Athenian female physician, and ends with Viola Davis, who became the first black actor to win an Oscar, Emmy, and Tony when she took home an Academy Award on Feb. 26 for her supporting turn in the film “Fences.”Phyllis Thompson, lecturer on Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, visits “Playing Fair? Title IX at 45” exhibit at the Schlesinger Library, which included materials she used in her class on the history of feminism. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerThere are other online timelines that chart feminism, but most begin sometime around 1700 and mainly support the idea of three important “waves.” The first, from the 19th century to the early 20th, stressed the vote, while the second, from the 1960s to the ’80s, emphasized equality in the workplace and in other areas of society. The third is ongoing, with a focus on cultural diversity.But defining the movement in such a strict chronological sense ignores critical voices, Thompson said.For example, she said, “that kind of periodization effaces the work that black feminists did in the 19th century because they are not involved in the fight for the vote in the same visible way as, say, [Elizabeth Cady] Stanton and [Susan B.] Anthony, and yet they are fundamentally more progressive.”To address another imbalance, Thompson had her students contribute feminist-related entries to the largely male-oriented online encyclopedia Wikipedia.“Around 90 percent of the Wiki authors are male, so there’s been a real short-shrifting of topics pertaining to women and to feminism,” said Thompson, whose students crafted submissions on topics ranging from the Project on the Status of the Education of Women to Vilma Rose Hunt, a scientist and Radcliffe College graduate who helped establish links between smoking and lung cancer.Nora O’Neill ’18, a history of science concentrator with a secondary in women and gender studies, worked on a submission about the Junior League of Boston, a service-devoted women’s volunteer group founded in 1906. O’Neill said the course not only helped her understand how much of “history is political,” it also offered her a concrete way to make a difference.“Much of our own history has been ignored and erased,” said O’Neill. “This class was a way for me to learn that history, but also to fight back, to force inclusion of female figures in our mainstream history, like through Wikipedia.”Students also wrote about 70 entries for the Online Biographical Dictionary of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the United States, an archive compiling biographical sketches of female supporters of suffrage campaigns in the first two decades of the 20th century.For much of their research, students needed only to take a quick walk across campus. Librarians at the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study provided key support. Thompson said about 20 percent of the timeline’s entries came from Schlesinger material.In addition to encouraging students to “be makers of public history — to make feminism” through research and writing, Thompson urged them to make the future. For final projects, students crafted their own visions for a more equitable world in the form of a manifesto, a work of art, or a film.Several men took the class, including Jake Stepansky ’17, a psychology concentrator with a secondary in Theater, Dance & Media. Along with feeling like he was making “real-life contributions” through the various assignments, Stepansky said the classroom discussions helped him understand he was “coming from a place of privilege as a white male.”“If you are really trying to be diverse and inclusive,” he said, “it’s important to go into rooms with people who aren’t like you and just listen.”last_img read more

The Armed Forces of Peru and Colombia Cooperate against Illegal Mining

first_imgThe basis of the agreement between Peru and Colombia is to stop an unlawful enterprise which accounts for huge revenues for organized crime groups in both nations. “This is a bilateral battle because we share the problems of terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal mining and others, and therefore we are coordinating the joint execution of our actions,” added Daniel Urresti, Peru’s Minister of Internal Affairs. Strategy includes help for civilian population In addition to calling for joint action by security forces against illegal miners, the treaty also seeks to promote sustainable economic activities, such as fish farming and the production of cacao in the border region, the Embassy of Colombia in Lima stated. Cacao production provides an alternative to the illegal cultivation of coca leaves for the purpose of producing cocaine. The Putumayo River is located along the border between Peru and Colombia. The two countries are divided by a continuous, 1,626 kilometer-long-long border. Organized crime groups generate about $29 billion from illegal mining annually in Peru, according to the Office of the Chairman of Peru’s Council of Ministers. This figure is 12 percent higher than the estimated annual revenue – about $25 billion – generated in Peru by drug trafficking. It also calls on Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to stop organized crime groups from smuggling the machinery needed to engage in illegal mining, according to the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Relations. The Armed Forces of the two countries are working cooperatively to carry out the Memorandum of Understanding they signed in February 2014. The agreement calls for Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to develop a strategy to fight illegal mining; to assess the environmental impact of such activity; to share information about such unlawful enterprises, and to carry out joint law enforcement operations to fight this crime. By Dialogo January 16, 2015 The governments of Peru and Colombia are working in cooperation along the border the two countries share to stop illegal mining and mitigate its impact on the environment. The Putumayo River is located along the border between Peru and Colombia. The two countries are divided by a continuous, 1,626 kilometer-long-long border. Illegal mining generates billions of dollars annually In Colombia, about 63 percent of all mining is conducted illegally, according to the Office of the Comptroller General. “The work along the Peru-Colombia border focuses on the Putumayo River basin, where we must meet the needs of the communities, finding a balance between human settlements and the environment,” Soto Castañola said. The agreement between the two countries warrants for a broad strategy of enforcement against illegal mining, protection of the ecosystem, and improved opportunities for communities that live in the border region. “In this partnership with Colombia, we have planned for actions against all acts that threaten the security, economy, natural resources, environment and health of our two nations stemming from illegal mining and related criminal offenses, such as trafficking in persons and forced child labor,” said Augusto Aníbal Soto Castañola, the High Commissioner for Mining Formalization in Peru. It also calls on Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to stop organized crime groups from smuggling the machinery needed to engage in illegal mining, according to the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Relations. center_img The basis of the agreement between Peru and Colombia is to stop an unlawful enterprise which accounts for huge revenues for organized crime groups in both nations. The agreement between the two countries warrants for a broad strategy of enforcement against illegal mining, protection of the ecosystem, and improved opportunities for communities that live in the border region. In addition to calling for joint action by security forces against illegal miners, the treaty also seeks to promote sustainable economic activities, such as fish farming and the production of cacao in the border region, the Embassy of Colombia in Lima stated. Cacao production provides an alternative to the illegal cultivation of coca leaves for the purpose of producing cocaine. “This is a bilateral battle because we share the problems of terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal mining and others, and therefore we are coordinating the joint execution of our actions,” added Daniel Urresti, Peru’s Minister of Internal Affairs. Annually, organized crime groups launder about $48.5 billion generated by illegal mining, according to a report titled, “Mining in Colombia, Institutionality and Territory, Paradoxes and Conflicts,” released by the Office of the Comptroller General. Strategy includes help for civilian population “The work along the Peru-Colombia border focuses on the Putumayo River basin, where we must meet the needs of the communities, finding a balance between human settlements and the environment,” Soto Castañola said. Illegal mining generates billions of dollars annually The Armed Forces of the two countries are working cooperatively to carry out the Memorandum of Understanding they signed in February 2014. The agreement calls for Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to develop a strategy to fight illegal mining; to assess the environmental impact of such activity; to share information about such unlawful enterprises, and to carry out joint law enforcement operations to fight this crime. Annually, organized crime groups launder about $48.5 billion generated by illegal mining, according to a report titled, “Mining in Colombia, Institutionality and Territory, Paradoxes and Conflicts,” released by the Office of the Comptroller General. In Colombia, about 63 percent of all mining is conducted illegally, according to the Office of the Comptroller General. Organized crime groups generate about $29 billion from illegal mining annually in Peru, according to the Office of the Chairman of Peru’s Council of Ministers. This figure is 12 percent higher than the estimated annual revenue – about $25 billion – generated in Peru by drug trafficking. The governments of Peru and Colombia are working in cooperation along the border the two countries share to stop illegal mining and mitigate its impact on the environment. “In this partnership with Colombia, we have planned for actions against all acts that threaten the security, economy, natural resources, environment and health of our two nations stemming from illegal mining and related criminal offenses, such as trafficking in persons and forced child labor,” said Augusto Aníbal Soto Castañola, the High Commissioner for Mining Formalization in Peru. It’s so good to be a reservist in the military forces, I didn’t last 20 years in our dear and beloved COLOMBIAN AIR FORCE in vain… Don’t shut the mines down on the miners. Let them work, or give them the food they work for so they may eat I didn’t like it Well, truly, how could we not thank those who have helped us so much. Before we’d travel on mules because we had no roads, thanks to this valuable help the roads were opened up and along with this came automobiles, the beginning of development for any civilization. And so, thousands of other things.last_img read more

Oppo Watch Review | NDTV Gadgets 360

first_imgThe Oppo Watch runs Google’s Wear OS and can be paired with an Android smartphone as well as an iPhone. I paired the watch to a Google Pixel 3 (Review) as well as an iPhone 11 (Review), but the experience was significantly better on the Android smartphone. Apple’s tight grip on privacy and app control seriously cripples the paired Wear OS smartwatch. I wasn’t able to reply to notifications when paired to the iPhone, pretty much limiting the Oppo Watches capabilities to that of a notifier. The experience was a lot smoother when paired with an Android phone , and I could reply to messages easily. Wear OS auto suggests basic replies but I could open up a small keyboard and swipe to type a message. I could also take calls quite easily on the watch, but I had to raise it next to my face to hear the caller. People I spoke to did not have any complaints about call quality.The AMOLED display has punchy contrast and very good viewing angles. There is an ambient light sensor that sets the brightness automatically. I found the Oppo Watch to be a bit aggressive with keeping the brightness low to preserve battery life, and I had to manually bump the brightness up when I was outdoors. If you do this often or control the brightness manually, you will see an impact on battery life. The Oppo Watch responds to the raise-to-wake gesture very well, and the moment you move your hand back down the display goes off.The Oppo Watch does a decent job of step and distance tracking. I counted 500 steps as I walked, and the watch counted 513 steps. If you set the watch to track you while walking outdoors, it latches onto a GPS signal very quickly. I walked around for 500m and the watch showed 0.51km which is within acceptable levels. If you are a casual user who wants a rough idea of the number of steps you take and distance you cover, the Oppo Watch will do that. For higher accuracy you should consider dedicated fitness trackers.oppo watch review heartrate Oppo Watch ReviewThe Oppo Watch is capable of tracking heart rate and sleep quality oppo watch review band connector Oppo Watch ReviewThe Oppo Watch uses proprietary connectors for the strap The gorgeous display flows into an aluminum case that feels premium to the touch. There are two buttons on the right, while the left has the speaker. The lower button has an accent and can be set to perform any function you choose. This also acts as the power button if you long-press it. The button at the top is used to open the app drawer and acts as the back key; long-pressing it summons the Google Assistant.oppo watch review buttons Oppo Watch ReviewThe Oppo Watch has two buttons on the right side along with the mic- Advertisement – Heart rate tracking on the Oppo Watch was fairly accurate and it was in the same range as reported by the Mi Watch Revolve. The Oppo Watch was also quick to track changes in heart rate while exercising. Sleep tracking was accurate and the Oppo Watch did give me a breakdown of time spent in deep sleep, in light sleep, and awake. You can only see this breakup on the watch, but Oppo recommends downloading its HeyTap app to sync heart rate and sleep data. The HeyTap app also allows you to customise watch faces on the device.With heart-rate tracking set to continuous, and handling a few notifications, the Oppo Watch lasted me for about a day and a half per charge. If you are planning to track workouts every day and answer a few calls on the watch as well, you can expect about one full day’s worth of battery life. There is an always-on display option that can be enabled in the Wear OS app, but it will make battery life drop quicker. With my usage pattern, I found myself charging the watch in the morning (after wearing it overnight to track sleep) while having breakfast, and it slowly became a habit to drop the watch on the charger at that time.You can enable the power saver mode to extend battery life, but that means the Oppo Watch offers limited functionality. Step tracking and heart rate tracking work, and of course it displays the time, but you can’t log workouts, run any apps, or even see notifications. You will need to reboot or snap the watch into its charger to get out of power saver mode.oppo watch review vooc watch charger Oppo Watch ReviewThe Oppo Watch comes with a magnetic charging cradle, and charges quickly Oppo has kept the device weight down, and the body alone weighs 40g. The fluororubber straps feel light as well and the watch size felt perfect on my wrist. You get a bigger 430mAh battery if you opt for the 46mm Oppo Watch, compared to 300mAh for the 41mm variant. The 46mm Oppo Watch is priced at Rs. 19,990 while the smaller 41mm Oppo Watch is priced at Rs. 14,990. You get a Watch VOOC Flash charger in the box. It is magnetic and holds the watch in place while charging.Oppo Watch specifications and performanceOppo has used the Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 3100 processor to power this watch. There is a secondary low-power ambiq Micro Apollo 3 SoC that takes over when the watch is put in power saver mode. There is 1GB of RAM on the Oppo Watch, which makes a huge difference to the performance. I found the watch to be quick to respond to my inputs, and did not notice any lag while using it.There is Bluetooth 4.2 to keep the watch connected to your smartphone, and 2.4GHz Wi-Fi so that it can work independently as well. There is no cellular data option. You get 8GB of internal storage as well. The 46mm Oppo Watch is water resistant upto 5ATM while the smaller 41mm variant is water resistant up to 3ATM. There is in-built GPS, GLONASS, and A-GPS. It also has support for NFC.oppo watch review amoled display Oppo Watch ReviewThe crisp AMOLED display on the Oppo Watch is legible outdoors Is that an Apple Watch? That was the first thought that ran through my mind when I received the Oppo Watch. The design and the packaging definitely look inspired by the Apple Watch, but the similarities end there, as the Oppo Watch runs Google’s Wear OS. With tech companies slowing down on smartwatches and only traditional watch manufacturers seemingly promoting Wear OS for a while now, it is good to see Oppo stepping in. Does the Oppo Watch make a strong case for Wear OS, or will this device go down as an Apple Watch replica? I test the watch to figure out that answer.Oppo Watch designThe Oppo Watch can easily be confused for an Apple Watch, and a few people I met did assume it was the fruity device. Although the design looks inspired, Oppo has nailed it when it comes to fit and finish. The first thing that will grab your attention about the Oppo Watch is its AMOLED display. It is big, measuring 1.91 inches, and is curved on two sides. This not only looks good, but is also useful when swiping through the interface.- Advertisement – Charging the Oppo Watch isn’t much of an issue. It snaps onto the charging cradle easily. The watch got to 43 percent in 15 minutes, and 89 percent in 30 minutes. It took 42 minutes to charge completely.VerdictThe Oppo Watch is very well designed and is a full-featured smartwatch running Google’s Wear OS. In fact, it is one of the better Wear OS watches I’ve used recently, and the price is reasonable. I would recommend the 46mm Oppo Watch over the 41mm variant since the smaller battery could mean below-average battery life.Sadly, Google hasn’t done much with its Wear OS platform of late, and this watch’s lack of innovative features could be down to the platform. If you are an Android user looking for a functional smartwatch, the Oppo Watch is definitely worth taking a look at.. However, if you are an iPhone user, the Oppo Watch wouldn’t be ideal since Wear OS has multiple limitations. Instead, you can take a look at the Apple Watch Series 3. – Advertisement – You won’t find lugs on the Oppo Watch as the straps attach directly to the aluminium body. It looks clean, but the downside is that the design is proprietary and finding replacements won’t be easy. Oppo claims that the straps are made out of fluororubber, and they feel light. Over the course of two weeks using this watch, these straps never caused any irritation or rashes on my skin. You can separate the strap from the body by pressing tiny release buttons at the back. A firm press is enough to release the strap, but it wouldn’t come off accidentally.The back of the Oppo Watch has the heart-rate sensor in a dome in the centre, while the rest of the back is plastic. The sensor dome is made out of ceramic only for the 46mm Oppo Watch; the smaller 41mm Oppo Watch has a plastic dome. The charging pins are positioned towards the bottom and are slightly recessed. I did not notice any discolouration or corrosion on these pins during the review period.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Tokyo organizers quietly plan for potential Olympic delay, sources say

first_imgThe options, which include scaling back the Games or holding them without spectators, would be debated by the organizing committee at the end of March, the official said.The second source, who is also close to the Tokyo 2020 organizing committee, confirmed that postponement was being discussed, including delays of one or two years.Some organizing staff were holding out hope for a delay of a month or 45 days, said the official involved in drafting the scenarios.A final decision on postponement will have to come from the IOC but Japan’s stance also matters.Read also: USA Track and Field calls for Olympics postponementBoard concernsThe IOC and its powerful chief, Thomas Bach, say the Games will go ahead as planned, drawing fire from athletes who say that could be a health risk.Two other insiders, both senior members of the Tokyo 2020 organizing committee, echoed those concerns. One of them, a board member of the organizing committee, said the decision to postpone should be made quickly.”The more they push the decision away … more and more preparations have to be made – this will cause cancellation fees to go through the roof,” the board member said.Bach recently appeared to shift his tone, saying the IOC was “considering different scenarios”.Japan’s Nikkei newspaper said in a report on its website on Sunday that the IOC will hold a board meeting this week, as calls from sporting organisations for the event to be postponed gathered pace.The official involved in drafting scenarios said a long delay could spark complaints from older athletes and require keeping sponsors on board for longer. Another headache is the Olympic village, due to be converted to flats after the Games.The summer 2021 calendar is already crowded while 2022 will see the soccer World Cup and the Beijing Winter Olympics.Japanese sponsors are nervous, company representatives have said privately. Major sponsors include Toyota Motor Corp and Panasonic Corp.”Of course companies are individually discussing what to do,” said a representative of one of the more than 60 sponsors. “No one wants to be the first to say anything about the possibility of a postponement.”Japan Airlines Co discussed that there was an 80 percent chance the Olympics would not be held as scheduled on a recent internal conference call, a person briefed on the call said.A JAL spokesman said: “Our preparations are underway for the Games to open as scheduled”.In Tokyo, there is a sense delay may be inevitable. Finance Minister Taro Aso has compared Tokyo 2020 to the 1940 Olympics cancelled by World War II, and the boycott of the 1980 Moscow Games.”It’s a problem that’s happened every 40 years,” he said. “It’s the cursed Olympics – and that’s a fact.”Topics : Tokyo 2020 organizers have started drafting possible alternatives to holding the Olympics this summer, two sources familiar with the talks said, in contrast to the Japanese government’s stance that postponement is not an option.While the coronavirus outbreak has disrupted sports events around the world, Japan has been steadfast in saying that the Games will go on. The top government spokesman on Wednesday said Tokyo wasn’t preparing for postponement.Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has staked his legacy as Japan’s longest-serving premier on the Games and is hoping for a boom in tourism and consumer spending. At risk is more than $3 billion in domestic sponsorship, an Olympic record, and some $12 billion spent on preparations. “Finally, we have been asked to make a simulation in case of a postponement,” said one of the sources, an official close to the organizing committee who is involved in drafting the scenarios.Both sources spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.”We are making alternative plans – plan B, C, D – looking at different postponement time-frames,” said the official, adding the scenarios included cost estimates for different delays.Neither Tokyo 2020 organizers nor the International Olympic Committee (IOC) immediately responded to a request for comment. The government of Japan could not be reached for comment.last_img read more

The faces behind the numbers: Remembering COVID-19 victims

first_imgFor many people in coronavirus-stricken Indonesia, tuning into the government’s daily press conference detailing the latest data on confirmed cases and deaths linked to COVID-19 has become a mundane ritual – an exercise in news consumption amid great uncertainty.For some others who have lost their loved ones to the disease, however, the constantly updated statistics signify a void left in their private lives.Behind every number that illustrates the magnitude of the current health emergency is an intimate story of resilience and perseverance in the face of a crisis. This was because her father, University of Indonesia scholar and epidemiologist Bambang Sutrisna, had made it his mission to treat sick individuals at his clinic despite the inherent risk of infection.“Papa was a hard worker. He truly cared for others, particularly his patients and students,” Leonita said, adding that her father had kept his clinic open to the public amid the outbreak.The 29-year-old woman, who has been following in her father’s footsteps to become a doctor, said she had always harbored concerns for his well-being, especially as the outbreak escalated in mid-March.Bambang received a visit from a patient suffering from symptoms typically associated with COVID-19 on March 12, and for some time after the encounter he still seemed healthy, Leonita said.However, five days later, he began to complain about severe headaches, high fever and a dry cough – known symptoms of COVID-19. She began to wonder whether her worst fears were about to become a reality.“Papa never complained about anything. He was a tough soul, so him suddenly complaining about his illness was a real cause for concern,” said Leonita, adding that she and her mother started to exhibit similar symptoms soon after.Despite his deteriorating health, Bambang initially refused to be taken to the hospital, saying he couldn’t miss his online teaching session, she recounted.Realizing the gravity of the situation, Leonita asked her husband to drive her father to Persahabatan Hospital in East Jakarta, one of the COVID-19 referral centers in the capital, for immediate treatment on March 22.Bambang succumbed to the disease the following day. He was 70 years old.“My father was a lifelong medical practitioner. He dedicated his life to ensuring the public’s well-being,” Leonita said.She went on to say that she was lucky to have been able to witness her father’s funeral along with other family members, as the burial procedure for COVID-19 victims was not yet as strict as it is now.“Please, don’t let my father die in vain. He had a much more difficult task: treating his patients. Surely the rest of us can help by complying with the PSBB [large-scale social restrictions]. Let the number [of casualties] serve as a real warning.”Read also: Doctors die as hospital crisis loomsDr. Ketty Herawati SultanaDr. Ketty Herawati Sultana (courtesy of Instagram/@kathyhera)As the number of cases and fatalities related to COVID-19 in the country continues to increase, concerns have been raised regarding the safety of health workers, including doctors and nurses, especially given the lack of protective equipment available at hospitals across the country.As of last month, 25 doctors had died of COVID-19, according to data from the Indonesian Doctors Association.Dr. Ketty Herawati Sultana, 60, was among the fallen ones. She was one of the medical personnel treating Transportation Minister Budi Karya Sumadi at Medistra Hospital in South Jakarta after he tested positive for COVID-19 in March.“I was away on duty in East Nusa Tenggara when I got word that my mother was ill and had been taken to an emergency unit on March 27. I heard that she was experiencing shortness of breath and had diarrhea,” Ketty’s daughter and medical trainee Meggy Oktaviani said.Meggy, 29, immediately booked a flight to Jakarta upon learning about the unfortunate news. However, it was already too late by then, she said.Ketty’s oxygen levels kept depleting, while her overall health condition continued deteriorating. Meggy braced herself for the worst-case scenario.“She most likely contracted the virus from patients at Medistra Hospital. She had told me that many patients with COVID-19 symptoms, such as diarrhea, had been admitted to the hospital,” Meggy told the Post.Ketty passed away on April 3. Unfortunately, health authorities had by then imposed a stricter burial protocol for COVID-19 victims, forcing Meggy and other family members to miss the physician’s funeral.“We were only allowed to pray in front of her coffin. We watched her cremation via video call afterward,” she recounted, calling it “a difficult experience”.Meggy called on the government to ensure a steady supply of protective health gear since the lives of many doctors were at stake amid the outbreak.“Those working on the front line like my mother deserve protection. They’ve been working tirelessly to save lives. It’s the least the government could do,” she said.Read also: Alone on their deathbed, how COVID-19 keeps families away from loved onesDrs. Tenang Malem TariganTenang Malem Tarigan (Courtesy of /Christianto Tarigan)Christianto Tarigan never thought he would not have the chance to say goodbye to his father in his last moments. Yet, he had no choice but to confront such a reality when his father, prominent Medan State Polytechnic scholar Tenang Malem Tarigan, died of the coronavirus disease.“My mother and father had contracted the disease. My mother had been hospitalized since April 18, whereas my father and younger brother only underwent rapid tests,” Christianto said.He added that the results of the rapid tests came back negative, but the subsequent results of swab tests revealed his mother and father to be COVID-19-positive.Tenang was then promptly hospitalized at Bina Kasih Hospital in Medan, North Sumatra from April 18 to 22. He passed away at 62 years old on the evening of April 23, just as he was about to be transferred to Martha Friska Hospital.“My father experienced shortness of breath when he was being taken to Martha Friska Hospital. He couldn’t be saved,” Christianto said, adding that his father had diabetes and high blood pressure prior to the COVID-19 diagnosis.He said his family was heartbroken they could not pay their last respects to Tenang due to the strict burial protocol.“He passed away at 8:15 p.m. and was laid to rest at around 1 a.m. My brother, who witnessed the burial, could only see our father’s face for one minute when he was already wrapped in a body bag. It was devastating,” he said.In the days that followed, Christianto tried to come to terms with the situation by upholding his father’s motto.“He used to tell me: ‘Don’t cry in the darkness, light up a candle’. It’s an embodiment of his spirit,” he said.Topics : Relatives of several COVID-19 patients who succumbed to the disease have spoken with The Jakarta Post. Below are their faces and stories.Bambang SutrisnaProf. Bambang Sutrisna (Courtesy of University of Indonesia’s School of Public Health/-)Leonita Triwachyuni felt that it was only a matter of when, not if, her father would be infected with the deadly virus.last_img read more

CHEC Kicks Off Tibar Port Works

first_imgImage source: tl.chineseembassy.orgChinese Harbor Engineering Co Ltd (CHEC) has officially started construction of the Port of Tibar in Timor-Leste with the first blasts at a quarry to collect construction materials, the Chinese embassy in the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste reported earlier this week. According to their announcement, the official ceremony to launch the work took place on 15 July.During the event, Chinese Ambassador in Timor-Leste, Xiao Jianguo, said: “I am very pleased to attend the launching ceremony of the quarry blasting for the Tibar Bay Port Project. As we know, there’s a regulation in Timor-Leste to ban, in general, all explosions, but special permission was given by Timor-Leste government to the project constructor, China Harbor Engineering Co., Ltd. to use explosives in the earthwork for this project, which is essential and critical to ensure on-time success of the whole project.”Infrastructure is the key area of China Timor-Leste practical cooperation, in which Chinese enterprises have actively and widely participated. At present, there are approximately 20 Chinese enterprises operating in areas related to infrastructure, added Jianguo.Located about 10 kilometers west of Dili in the Bay of Tibar, the project also includes the participation of the International Finance Corporation (IFC) of the World Bank Group.The ceremony was attended by senior representatives of the government of Timor-Leste, including the Ministers of Transport and Communications, José Agostinho da Silva, of Agriculture and Fisheries, Joaquim José Gusmão dos Reis Martins and of Defence, Filomeno da Paixão de Jesus, as well as the Chinese ambassador in Dili, Xiao Jianguo.last_img read more

Brazilian great Zico excited by Atalanta

first_img Zico is backing the Oribici to go even further in the Champions League after they reached the quarterfinals. He told Gazzetta dello Sport, “I say Atalanta, who are expressing a beautiful game, a very strong collective.Advertisement Loading… “I can see them in the finals. Yes, because beating them at home in Bergamo is very difficult and City have noticed it.” The former Udinese star says he still follows Serie A. read also:Zico: I’m a fan of Juve striker Paulo Dybala “Sure. It’s had a bit of difficulty in recent years expressing talent, especially in attack, but it’s always Italy. It’s improving, it’s lost the big names, which ended up in England, Spain and even Germany. So young people don’t learn, they don’t have examples. When we were there, me, Platini, Maradona, Del Piero, Baggio or Totti grew up.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content7 Worst Things To Do To Your PhoneSome Impressive And Almost Shocking Robots That ExistBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes8 Shows You Didn’t Want To Watch At The End11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By Odeith6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True Brazilian great, Zico believes Atalanta can pull off more surprises when the season resumes.last_img read more

NegOcc donates land for PhilHealth office

first_imgUnder the Universal Health Care (UHC)Law of 2019, PhilHealth will implement a new premium schedule for directcontributors aimed at ensuring the sustainability of the National HealthInsurance Fund, which will guarantee that all Filipinos can avail of outpatientbenefit packages and immediate eligibility to benefits during confinement. BACOLOD City – The provincialgovernment of Negros Occidental has donated a parcel of land to the PhilippineHealth Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth), which will serve as the permanent site ofthe agency’s local office here. Lacson, who received a certificate ofappreciation from Mas and Monteverde, noted PhilHealth’s vital contribution inalleviating the high cost of medicines and hospitalization being paid byFilipinos. Beginning 2020, PhilHealth willincrease the rate to three percent and will be adjusted to increments of 0.5percent every year until it reaches the five-percent limit in 2025, as providedin the UHC Law. The Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) was created to implement universal health coverage in the country. On Dec. 6, the provincial government of Negros Occidental has donated a parcel of land to PhilHealth, which will serve as the permanent site of the agency’s local office in Bacolod City. PHILHEALTH The donation has been approved by theProvincial Board as provided in Resolution 0484 dated May 29, 2019. Dilag said the date of the buildingconstruction has yet to be finalized as the PhilHealth management still has toapprove the manner of the project implementation. At present, PhilHealth is leasing aprivate building being occupied by its local office in this city. “As an act of generosity, the donor,the province of Negros Occidental, does hereby transfer and convey unto thedonee, PhilHealth, by way of donation the above-described property,” a portionof the document read. “The donee has requested the donor fora vacant lot to house its local health insurance office (LHIO) building,” itadded.  Under Circular 2019-0009, the premiumfor direct contributors is pegged at 2.75 percent of the monthly basic salary,with an adjusted ceiling of P50,000. The deed of donation for the 1,239-sqmproperty located in Barangay Mansilingan was signed by Gov. Eugenio Jose Lacsonand PhilHealth Senior Vice President Dennis Mas in rites held at the ProvincialCapitol Social Hall on Dec. 6. Mas, who heads the Management ServiceSector, signed on behalf of PhilHealth president and chief executive RicardoMorales, in the presence of Janet Monteverde, acting regional vice president ofPhilHealth-Western Visayas, and Romel Dilag, head of LHIO-Bacolod.(With a report from PNA/PN)last_img read more