Revenue Department stationed in northern TCI

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Mother charged with murder of her young son Child dead and man arrested on Taylor murder Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 27 Oct 2015 – North and Middle Caicos are getting some tailor made service from the Revenue Department which will fly in so that paying government bills or making enquiries will be easier. The officers are there since Monday and will be in the two islands until this Friday. District Commissioner, Cynclair Musgrove said: “The District Commissioner’s Office and the Communities of North & Middle Caicos welcome the Revenue Department as we are striving to continue improving service delivery and further assist the Officers with improving customer education and voluntary compliance in North & Middle Caicos.” The team will be stationed at the DCs office in Bottle Creek, North Caicos. Among the tasks: inspections and audits, service delivery improvements and registering businesses. Musgrove says the scheduled visits will be an ongoing service. Related Items:bottle creek, cynclair musgrove, north and middle caicos, revenue department Recommended for you PNP Administration leaders serve Elderly in New Year’s Partylast_img read more

Appropriations Committee Asks for Detailed Analysis of Infrastructure Needs in BRAC Study

first_imgCiting its concern about the Pentagon’s repeated calls for a new BRAC round, the House Appropriations Committee directs DOD to provide a comprehensive assessment of its infrastructure needs.“Though the committee is not endorsing or precluding another BRAC round, it is interested in more detailed information that would help lead Congress to make an informed decision on that question,” states the committee report accompanying the fiscal 2016 military construction-veterans affairs spending measure that was released Tuesday.The committee requests DOD provide by Dec. 31, 2015, a comprehensive inventory of military installations as well as:a description of the infrastructure necessary to support ongoing defense activities;a discussion of categories of excess infrastructure and infrastructure capacity, and “the secretary’s  targets for the reduction of such excess capacity”;an assessment of the excess infrastructure and the value of retaining certain excess infrastructure to support surge or reversibility requirements; andan analysis of the economic impact of the closure or realignment of installations to reduce excess infrastructure.To determine the extent of excess capacity, the department should consider:the anticipated continuing need for and availability of installations outside the United States, along with the potential for future restrictions on their use; andany efficiencies that may be gained from joint tenancy by more than one branch at an installation or by reorganizing two or more installations into a single facility.The analysis would require a certification from the defense secretary regarding the need for the closure or realignment of installations. The committee also asks the secretary to certify that “every recommendation for closure or realignment of military installations in a round of closures and realignments will result in annual net savings for each of the military departments within six years” after a new round begins.The committee’s request mirrors very closely language in the House version of the FY 2015 defense authorization bill. That provision, which was viewed as a possible first step toward congressional approval of the department’s request for a new BRAC round, was struck from the compromise version of the policy bill, however.In this case, the request for an assessment of DOD’s infrastructure needs may not be as significant since the Appropriations Committee is not responsible for authorizing a BRAC round, but it seems to signal that the committee’s military construction-veterans affairs panel believes a strong case could be made for a future round.The committee report for the milcon spending bill can be found on its website. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Snowball the dancing cockatoo gets serious scrutiny from science

first_imgEnlarge ImageSnowball got down for a Taco Bell ad. Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET Ha, ha! Check this out! It’s a dancing cockatoo! This is how Snowball, a bird with a passion for dance, made the rounds as a viral video sensation getting down to the Backstreet Boys back in 2007. But Snowball is more than an amusement, he’s also the star of a new scientific study.Researchers are studying Snowball to learn how dancing can transcend the human condition and extend to our avian friends. “Spontaneity and diversity of movement to music are not uniquely human” is the title of a paper published Monday in the journal Current Biology.A previous parrot study (and one with a sea lion) showed some animals can keep a musical beat, but this new Snowball research suggests the bird is inventing moves as he goes.  1 The science team, led by cognitive neuroscientist Aniruddh Patel of Tufts University and Harvard University, filmed Snowball dancing to Queen’s Another One Bites the Dust and Cyndi Lauper’s Girls Just Want to Have Fun. They analyzed the bird’s movements.The researchers counted 14 distinct dance moves and two composite movements. Snowball’s skills included a body roll, head bobs, foot lifts, head banging and a move reminiscent of Madonna’s ’90s Vogue dance craze. Snowball’s dance snippets tended to be performed for several seconds each, and he changed up his routine each time he heard a song again. “What’s most interesting to us is the sheer diversity of his movements to music,” Patel said in a statement on Monday. The study suggests Snowball may be displaying creativity in his dancing. The research team is currently investigating if the cockatoo’s capers are a form of social interaction with his human caregivers. Sea lion may be first nonhuman mammal to keep a beat Cussing rescue parrot forges sweet Amazon Alexa friendship 11 Photos The researchers said a collection of shared traits between humans and parrots might be responsible for Snowball’s dancing prowess: “(1) complex vocal learning, (2) the capacity for nonverbal movement imitation, (3) a tendency to form long-term social bonds, (4) the ability to learn complex sequences of actions, and (5) attentiveness to communicative movements.”Snowball’s talent first came to light after he was taken in by the Bird Lovers Only rescue agency in South Carolina in 2007. Besides his viral fame, he also starred in a Taco Bell commercial.Snowball seems to be showing that cutting a rug and getting creative with it isn’t just for people. Perhaps he’ll earn himself an invite to Dancing with the Stars. Commentcenter_img 11 spectacular suits of animal battle armor (pictures) Curious critters Share your voice Tags Sci-Techlast_img read more