UE continues resurgence, beats UP

first_imgMark Maloles and Alvin Pasaol exchanged back-to-back triples in a span of 18 seconds to give UE a 68-58 with 2:49 remaining in the fourth quarter.Pasaol then delivered the dagger, converting a three-point play for a 71-62 lead with 1:33 left.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogUE head coach Derrick Pumaren is aware of their position in the Final Four race and he used their first win in the UAAP as their starting point and motivation in getting to the semifinals.“Until there’s a fourth team that makes it then we still have a shot at it,” said Pumaren of their Final Four shot. “We just have to stay positive in the things that are going on. We just have to play as a team and keep playing as one unit.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson View comments NU back on track, dumps winless UST Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netUniversity of the East strengthened its bid for a Final Four spot after humbling University of the Philippines, 73-64, in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament Sunday at Filoil Flying V Centre.The Red Warriors won their third game in four outings to improve to 3-7 and them on track of getting the fourth spot in the league while the Fighting Maroons slipped to a 4-6 record.ADVERTISEMENT Pasaol showed his might with 32 points and 13 rebounds to lead UE while Mark Olayon narrowly missed out on a triple-double finishing with 11 points, 10 rebounds, and eight assists.Rookie Juan Gomez de Liaño had 22 points and eight rebounds to lead UP while older brother Javi finished with 17 points and 11 boards. For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity.center_img Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny UAAP Season 80 Preview: UE Red Warriors PLAY LIST 02:56UAAP Season 80 Preview: UE Red Warriors05:05SEA Games 2019: Rubilen Amit finally beats Chezka Centeno for 9-ball gold (HIGHLIGHTS)02:57UAAP SEASON 80 PREVIEW: UP Fighting Maroons02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

President Sirleaf Condemns Las Vegas Mass Shooting

first_imgPresident Sirleaf has condemned in the strongest terms the cowardly act perpetrated against innocent lives, in a message of consolation to President Donald J. Trump of the United States of America, following the tragic news of a mass shooting which left fifty-nine (59) persons dead.The shooting incident, which occurred on Sunday, October 1, at a Las Vegas resort, also left at least five hundred and twenty-seven (527) others injured, some very seriously. It happened during a country music festival on the Las Vegas Strip. The shooter fired from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel.President Sirleaf extended condolences to the families of those whose lives were taken and prayed for the speedy and full recovery of the injured.According to a Foreign Affairs Ministry release, President Sirleaf stated in the message to her US counterpart, “During this time of sorrow and burden, I extend to you and the American people, especially those affected by this atrocious act, the warmth of friendship and condolences from the people of Liberia and in my own name.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

U.N. Experts Find Convincing Evidence of Large-Scale Sarin Attack in Syria

first_imgA team of U.N. inspectors has found “clear and convincing evidence” that a chemical weapons attack using the nerve agent sarin killed a large number of civilians near Damascus on 21 August. Although the team’s report does not discuss who was responsible for the attack, it includes information on the rockets used to deliver the sarin that some countries say implicates the Syrian government.U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who received the report yesterday from team leader and Swedish scientist Åke Sellström, said today at a press conference: “The findings are beyond doubt and beyond the pale. This is a war crime. … It is the most significant confirmed use of chemical weapons against civilians since Saddam Hussein used them in Halabja in 1988,” an attack that killed at least 3200 Kurds. (U.S. officials say 1400 people died in the recent Syrian attack.) But Ban stopped short of assigning blame, saying that was not the mission of the U.N. team.The group, which included experts from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in The Hague, visited the Ghouta suburb of Damascus between 26 August and 29 August. Their 38-page report (including appendices) contains sections on environmental samples such as soil and swipes from rockets; interviews with more than 50 survivors and with medical staff members; and blood, urine, and hair samples from survivors. Chemical testing on the biological and environmental samples was done by four OPCW-designated labs in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and Switzerland.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The survivors’ symptoms, sometimes still evident up to a week after the attack, included those typical of exposure to organophosphates such as sarin: loss of consciousness, shortness of breath, and blurred vision, for example. Tests of biological samples from survivors showed “definitive evidence of exposure to sarin” for most. And the majority of environmental samples, including rocket fragments, tested positive for sarin or its degradation products.The team’s conclusion: “Chemical weapons have been used in the ongoing conflict between the parties in the Syrian Arab Republic, also against civilians, including children, on a relatively large scale. In particular, the environmental, chemical and medical samples we have collected, provide clear and convincing evidence that surface-to-surface rockets containing the nerve agent sarin were used … in the Ghouta area of Damascus. This result leaves us with the deepest concern.”The report’s appendices include drawings and photos of rockets used to deliver the sarin. At the press conference, ambassadors to the United Nations from the United Kingdom, the United States, and France said that these details, and others described by Sellström in a briefing to the U.N. Security Council this morning, reinforce their previous assertions that only the Syrian regime could have launched the attack. For example, a single warhead could hold 56 liters of nerve agent, a large amount; the quality of the sarin was higher than Saddam Hussein’s sarin; and the rocket type had apparently been used in the past by the regime but not by the Syrian rebels.Ralf Trapp, an arms control expert in Chessenaz, France, says that he finds the combination of weapons evidence convincing, too, as well as the fact—noted in the U.N. inspector’s report—that the rockets were launched early on a morning when the air was moving toward the ground, which meant the gas sank to the bottom of buildings and had greater effect. “That all points to a weapon that came from a military program, used by units that understand and have training in chemical warfare operations,” Trapp says. “On balance,” he adds, a scenario involving Syrian government use of the weapons “is the more likely.”Russia and the United States agreed over the weekend to a plan to allow U.N. inspectors to secure Syria’s chemical weapons and destroy them by the middle of next year, a process that would be overseen by the OPCW.last_img read more