Volleyball hosts unranked Arizona teams

first_imgSophomore outside hitter Khalia Lanier leaps into the air to spike the ball in a game against Cal at the Galen Center in Los Angeles. Photo by Kaan Demiroz | Daily TrojanThe No. 17 USC women’s volleyball team (16-7, 8-4 Pac-12) is back home after four straight away matches. On Friday, the Trojans host Arizona State, and on Sunday, they host Arizona.“This weekend we’re looking to have great games versus both Arizonas,” junior libero Victoria Garrick said. Last time the Women of Troy faced off against these two teams, they split their games. Out in Tucson, USC was stunned in a straight-sweep against the Wildcats (25-23, 25-17, 26-24). The team bounced back and picked up a four-set win in Tempe against the Sun Devils (19-25, 25-19, 25-20, 25-22). “We’re very excited for the Arizona game because they swept us,” Garrick said. “We were completely caught off guard. I don’t think we expected to lose the game, let alone get swept.”This time around, the Women of Troy will have home court advantage. As the Pac-12 is arguably the toughest conference for women’s volleyball, wins on the home court are vital. USC has fared well at the Galen Center: it has a home record of 6-1. The Trojans’ only loss at home was against then-No. 3 Stanford. Now the Cardinal has jumped up to No. 2 in the rankings. In its last four matches, USC has gone 2-2. Its offense has been missing a key component in sophomore outside hitter Khalia Lanier, who has been sidelined. In the team’s matches in Washington, freshman outside hitter Brooke Botkin continued to impress. Botkin had 30 kills on the weekend, a team high. She put up two aces and 18 digs. Rounding out the other side of USC’s attack are senior opposites Brittany Abercrombie and Niki Withers. The two combined for 52 kills in the team’s last two outings. “I know that [the Wildcats] should be a little frightened,” Garrick said. “We’re ready to get up for that match and really put the hammer on them.”To pick up two wins against the Arizona schools, the Women of Troy will need to rely on Botkin, Abercrombie and Withers. They’ll also need a resurgence of offensive strength from junior outside hitter Alyse Ford. While Ford did not play against the Huskies, she led the team with 14 kills two days later in their sweep of the Cougars. The Sun Devils are led by senior middle blocker Oluoma Okaro. Okaro has 385 kills on the season, averaging 4.48 kills per set. Arizona State’s offense is rounded out by freshman outside hitter Griere Hughes and sophomore outside hitter Ivana Jeremic. Hughes has 226 kills on the season, averaging by 2.94 kills per set. Jeremic has 221 kills on the season, averaging 2.76 kills per set. The Wildcats are led by a bevy of young talent. Freshman outside hitter Paige Whipple leads the team with 165 kills on the season, averaging 2.36 kills per set. Redshirt freshman outside hitter Elizabeth Shelton is second on the team with 132 kills on the season, averaging 2.10 kills per set. Freshman middle blocker Candice Denny is third on the list. Denny is seventh in the conference with a .356 hitting percentage overall and third in the conference with a .372 hitting percentage in league play. She’s on track to be the first freshman in program history to hit at least .350. The Women of Troy will have to limit powerful attacks from the Arizona schools to pick up two more wins at home.last_img read more

Guyana listed as “major money laundering jurisdiction” – US report

first_imgThe US Department of State’s International Narcotics Control Strategy Report (INCSR) Volume Two of March 2018 has listed Guyana, among many other countries, as “major money laundering jurisdictions in 2017”. The report declared that there was a lack of strong interagency cooperation among anti-money laundering (AML) and drug-fighting agencies, adding that these departments did not have adequate human resources and the necessary training for complete effectiveness.The report called for more training, education, and resources to improve the fight against money laundering. In its 2018 overview of Guyana, the INCSR posited that “narcotics trafficking and government corruption are the primary sources of laundered funds”. Other issues outlined were human trafficking, illicit gold mining, contraband, and tax evasion.The report reiterated that Guyana was a transit country for South American cocaine destined for Europe, the Caribbean and North America, noting that traffickers were attracted to Guyana’s remote airstrips, porous land borders, and weak security infrastructure.It was outlined that Guyana should continue to provide training to “increase awareness and understanding of AML laws within the judiciary and agencies. The major agencies involved in anti drug and money laundering efforts, such as the Guyana Police Force (GPF); Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA); the Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU); the Special Organised Crimes Unit (SOCU) and the Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU) were observed as not being effective enough owing to “inadequate human resources, insufficient training, and a lack of strong interagency cooperation”.Apart from Guyana, Brazil, Barbados, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago, Peru, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States itself were, among many others, listed as “Major Money Laundering Jurisdictions in 2017”.Only last month former Attorney General (AG) Anil Nandlall accused his successor, Basil Williams, of conveying the impression that the country was compliant with the Anti-Money Laundering and Countering the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) requirements, based on statements he had made in the National Assembly.He had pointed out that Williams admitted in Parliament he was informed by the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF) that amendments made to the AML/CFT Amendment Bill in 2015 were in violation of the international guidelines.Williams, he had observed, told the House that he was also directed to remove them from the legislation.Nandlall recalled that when the coalition took office in 2015, the first Bill it passed was the AML/CFT Amendment Bill, Number 1 of 2015. It was tabled at the very first sitting of the 11th Parliament.“It contained all of the objectionable amendments. It was tabled by Williams. He was boastful that he was able to pass the Bills that the previous Government could not pass. It is obvious, therefore, that we were never compliant with the international requirements, as the AG (had) previously informed the nation,” he stressed last monthThe former AG had also noted that while in Opposition, the now Government caused Guyana to be blacklisted by the CFATF, and to be sanctioned internationally. “Now in Government, they have caused the very same thing to happen!” he posited in March.last_img read more