Photos: Texas A&M’s Kyle Field Now Has Grass

first_imgview of Texas A&M's Kyle Field.@12thManFor much of the offseason, the playing surface at Texas A&M’s Kyle Field has looked more like a parking lot than it has a football field. With the Aggies’ renovating their stadium, Kyle Field has been without grass for months. The grass is back. Texas A&M has been installing its playing surface at Kyle Field over the last day or so. It looks great. Real spot! The NEW Kyle Field!! #12thman #GigEm pic.twitter.com/d8OIn7sOyQ— Jeff Banks (@jbsttamu) July 29, 2015West side almost done #kylefield pic.twitter.com/kNNkm2yMF8— Mendl (@CzechMendl) July 31, 2015Took a tour of Kyle Field at Texas A&M this morning. Impressive stuff. Largest SEC stadium. pic.twitter.com/GDOstRYXn1— Jarom Jordan (@jaromjordan) July 31, 2015 @12thMan@12thManLooking good, Aggies. Texas A&M’s first home game is set to take place Sept. 12 against Ball State.last_img read more

BW LPG to Nominate Three Directors to Dorian LPG Board

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license Oslo-based BW LPG has submitted the names of three director candidates to stand for election at Dorian LPG’s 2018 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders.The company said it intends to file a proxy statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission, accompanied by a WHITE proxy card, in connection with Dorian’s 2018 Annual Meeting.The move was made as a part of BW LPG’s takeover takeover attempt of Dorian. On May 29, 2018, BW LPG proposed to combine with Dorian in an all-stock transaction, under which Dorian shareholders would have received 2.05 BW LPG shares for each Dorian share.After its initial proposal got rejected, the company increased its all-stock proposal to combine with Dorian on July 9, under which Dorian shareholders would receive 2.12 BW LPG shares for each Dorian share.“Since announcing our proposal to combine with Dorian, the feedback we have received from a significant percentage of Dorian’s shareholders has been overwhelmingly positive, including a recent public letter of support from SEACOR Holdings, one of Dorian’s largest shareholders,” Martin Ackermann, BW LPG Chief Executive Officer, said.Ackermann explained that, due to Dorian’s continued refusal to engage with the company on the proposed combination, BW LPG have decided to go directly to shareholders with their director nominees, namely, Baudoin Lorans, Ouma Sananikone and Jeffrey Schwarz.Based on BW LPG’s current price of NOK 34.06 per share and an NOK/USD exchange rate of 8.13 as of July 13, 2018, BW LPG’s proposal to combine with Dorian values each Dorian share at USD USD 8.88 per share, representing a 28% premium to Dorian’s unaffected share price of USD USD 6.96 as of May 25, 2018, the last trading day prior to the announcement of BW LPG’s initial proposal, and a premium of 19% to the long-term historical exchange ratio of Dorian and BW LPG since Dorian’s IPO.last_img read more

Prime Minister Trudeau and Pope Francis discuss reconciliation at the Vatican

first_imgPrime Minister Justin Trudeau and Pope Francis discussed reconciliation with Canada’s indigenous peoples during a private meeting at the Vatican.In a statement, the Vatican said the pair also talked about conflicts in the Middle East, religious freedom and current ethical issues.Trudeau was also expected to bring up religious diversity and climate change during the meeting.At 1:04 p.m. on Monday, a bell rang, signalling the end of the private audience, which began in the Pope’s private quarters at 12:28 p.m.Trudeau then introduced his wife, Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, to the Pope along with officials from the Prime Minister’s Office.The prime minister gave the Pope a rare set of Jesuit Relations books, which have become an important source detailing the beginnings of Canada.Trudeau also presented the Pope with a Montagnais-French dictionary written by a French Jesuit in the 17th century.In return, the Pope gave the prime minister a gold medal marking the fourth year of his pontificate, an autographed copy of his message for World Peace Day and three papal letters about family, environment and evangelism. Watch the video below or click here. Trudeau was expected to ask the pontiff to issue a formal apology in Canada for the role of the Catholic Church in the residential school system.His government has promised a call to action on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s demand for a papal apology to survivors, their families and communities related to the dark legacy of residential schools.Related stories:Prime Minister Trudeau visits Italian town devastated by 2016 earthquakeTrudeau and Trump talk trade, security at G7 summitTop court to hear federal government’s appeal on residential school recordsTrudeau, in Rome this week following his participation at the NATO and G7 summits, wants to promote trade and other ties with Italy, including the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union.U.S. President Donald Trump met the pope at the Vatican last week.Monday morning, the prime minister took part in an event with the soccer team, A.S. Roma.His wife, Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, has joined him on this part of the trip and the couple were to celebrate their wedding anniversary with a private dinner in Rome on Sunday evening.On Sunday, Trudeau appealed to the heart of the country by visiting Amatrice, a tiny town still struggling to recover from a devastating earthquake. “It’s an opportunity to share our thoughts, our condolences, our sympathies, but also demonstrate our resolve to accompany our friends in this difficult time,” Trudeau said Sunday as he stood below a clock tower, the only structure standing on a street lined with rubble.That clock is stopped at 3:36 – the time in the morning the 6.2-magnitude quake hit the area in central Italy about 100 kilometres northeast of Rome on August 24, 2016. Some 300 people were killed, including one Canadian.Many of them were children, and signs of their presence, including an illustrated cloth book and a inflatable pool toy, could be seen among the rocks, dust and other rubble piled high.Efforts to rebuild the town, which includes many heritage buildings from medieval times, have been moving slowly.The Italian-Canadian community has been trying to bring more attention to that fact, raising money to help pay for things like medical vehicles needed to navigate the mountainous terrain.Those efforts got a boost May 12 when Trudeau appeared at a fundraiser that also featured Sergio Marchionne, the CEO of Fiat Chrysler who was born in Italy but went to school in Canada.Trudeau announced there that the Canadian government would match up to $2 million in donations to the Italy Earthquake Relief Fund.That drew sharp criticism from Conservative MP Maxime Bernier, who was nearing the end of the leadership race he ultimately lost to Andrew Scheer.At the time, Bernier took to Twitter to say that he loves Italy, but it is a rich country that can afford to rebuild without money from Canadian taxpayers, which he argued should have gone to help more victims of the floods in Quebec and eastern Ontario.The money will go toward humanitarian aid in the area, which is still experiencing tremors.The prime minister arrived in the town via an Italian government helicopter and he was greeted warmly with a long embrace by the local mayor, Sergio Pirozzi.In Amatrice, the Trudeaus surveyed the damage while wearing hard hats, spoke to residents, emergency responders and others working to rebuild the town.They also laid a bouquet of flowers at a memorial to the victims.Former prime minister Stephen Harper, who issued a residential schools apology on behalf of the Canadian government in 2008, did not raise the issue directly during a 10-minute audience with Pope Francis two years ago. Harper did mention the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.In 2009, the previous pope, Benedict XVI, did express “sorrow” on behalf of the Catholic Church for the “deplorable conduct” by some members of the church in their treatment of indigenous children in residential schools.The Truth and Reconciliation Commission report said this did not go far enough, especially since it was not made in public.last_img read more

How Facebook likes could profile voters for manipulation

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – Facebook “likes” can tell a lot about a person. Maybe even enough to fuel a voter-manipulation effort like the one a Trump-affiliated data-mining firm stands accused of — and which Facebook may have enabled.The social network is under fire after The New York Times and The Guardian newspaper reported that former Trump campaign consultant Cambridge Analytica used data, including user likes, inappropriately obtained from roughly 50 million Facebook users to try to influence elections.Monday was a wild roller coaster ride for Facebook, whose shares plunged 7 per cent in its worst one-day decline since 2014. Officials in the EU and the U.S. sought answers, while Britain’s information commissioner said she will seek a warrant to access Cambridge Analytica’s servers because the British firm had been “unco-operative” in her investigation. The first casualty of that investigation was an audit of Cambridge that Facebook had announced earlier in the day; the company said it “stood down” that effort at the request of British officials.Adding to the turmoil, the New York Times reported that Facebook security chief Alex Stamos will step down by August following clashes over how aggressively Facebook should address its role in spreading disinformation. In a tweet , Stamos said he’s still fully engaged at Facebook but that his role has changed.It would have been quieter had Facebook likes not turned out to be so revealing. Researchers in a 2013 study found that likes on hobbies, interests and other attributes can predict personal attributes such as sexual orientation and political affiliation. Computers analyze such data to look for patterns that might not be obvious, such as a link between a preference for curly fries and higher intelligence.Chris Wylie, a Cambridge co-founder who left in 2014, said the firm used such techniques to learn about individuals and create an information cocoon to change their perceptions. In doing so, he said, the firm “took fake news to the next level.”“This is based on an idea called ‘informational dominance,’ which is the idea that if you can capture every channel of information around a person and then inject content around them, you can change their perception of what’s actually happening,” Wylie said Monday on NBC’s “Today.” It’s not yet clear exactly how the firm might have attempted to do that.Late Friday, Facebook said Cambridge improperly obtained information from 270,000 people who downloaded an app described as a personality test. Those people agreed to share data with the app for research — not for political targeting. And the data included who their Facebook friends were and what they liked — even though those friends hadn’t downloaded the app or given explicit consent.Cambridge got limited information on the friends, but machines can use detailed answers from smaller groups to make good inferences on the rest, said Kenneth Sanford of the data science company Dataiku.Cambridge was backed by the conservative billionaire Richard Mercer, and at one point employed Stephen Bannon — later President Donald Trump’s campaign chairman and White House adviser — as a vice-president. The Trump campaign paid Cambridge roughly $6 million according to federal election records, although officials have more recently played down that work.The type of data mining reportedly used by Cambridge Analytica is fairly common, but is typically used to sell diapers and other products. Netflix, for instance, provides individualized recommendations based on how a person’s viewing behaviours fit with what other customers watch.But that common technique can take on an ominous cast if it’s connected to possible elections meddling, said Robert Ricci, a marketing director at Blue Fountain Media.Wylie said Cambridge Analytica aimed to “explore mental vulnerabilities of people.” He said the firm “works on creating a web of disinformation online so people start going down the rabbit hole of clicking on blogs, websites etc. that make them think things are happening that may not be.”Wylie told “Today” that while political ads are also targeted at specific voters, the Cambridge effort aimed to make sure people wouldn’t know they were getting messages aimed at influencing their views.The Trump campaign has denied using Cambridge’s data. The firm itself denies wrongdoing, and says it didn’t retain any of the data pulled from Facebook and didn’t use it in its 2016 campaign work.Yet Cambridge boasted of its work after another client, Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, won the Iowa caucus in 2016.Cambridge helped differentiate Cruz from similarly minded Republican rivals by identifying automated red light cameras as an issue of importance to residents upset with government intrusion. Potential voters living near the red light cameras were sent direct messages saying Cruz was against their use.Even on mainstay issues such as gun rights, Cambridge CEO Alexander Nix said at the time, the firm used personality types to tailor its messages. For voters who care about tradition, it could push the importance of making sure grandfathers can offer family shooting lessons. For someone identified as introverted, a pitch might have described keeping guns for protection against crime.It’s possible that Cambridge tapped other data sources, including what Cruz’s campaign app collected. Nix said during the Cruz campaign that it had five or six sources of data on each voter.Facebook declined to provide officials for interview and didn’t immediately respond to requests for information beyond its statements Friday and Monday. Cambridge also didn’t immediately respond to emailed questions.Facebook makes it easy for advertisers to target users based on nuanced information about them. Facebook’s mapping of the “social graph” — essentially the web of people’s real-life connections — is also invaluable for marketers.For example, researchers can look at people’s clusters of friends and get good insight as to who is important and influential, said Jonathan Albright, research director at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University. People who bridge different friend networks, for example, can have more influence when they post something, making them prime for targeting.Two-thirds of Americans get at least some of their news on social media, according on Pew Research Center. While people don’t exist in a Facebook-only vacuum, it is possible that bogus information users saw on the site could later be reinforced by the “rabbit hole” of clicks and conspiracy sites on the broader internet, as Wylie described.___An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated the sum paid by the 2016 Trump campaign to Cambridge Analytica. It was $5.9 million according to federal election records.AP technology reporter Ryan Nakashima contributed to this report from Menlo Park, California.last_img read more

Horgans natural gas framework announcement meets praise criticism

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. — Officials on both sides of the political spectrum have reacted to B.C. Premier John Horgan’s announcement for a new provincial framework for natural gas development with both praise and criticism.The Independent Contractors and Businesses Association’s president Chris Gardner said his organization supported today’s announcement, calling it a positive step forward for the province’s Liquefied Natural Gas industry.“We are thrilled with this big leap forward for LNG,” said Gardner. “LNG Canada’s potential investment in the B.C. would be the largest private sector investment in the history of our province. At more than $40 billion in private capital, it would be one of the largest projects every undertaken in Canada, it would create thousands of construction jobs, and it would generate opportunities and positive economic spinoffs for communities across B.C.” Gardner pointed out that with the NDP and BC Liberals both on board, a provincial LNG industry has broad political support. “By unlocking our world class energy asset, B.C.’s LNG industry will play an important role in reducing global greenhouse gas emissions by helping many Asian countries transition off coal,” he  added.Meanwhile, the Wilderness Committee said that the province is giving a massive tax break and otherwise lowering corporate costs in a bid to lure LNG Canada into building a huge liquified natural gas facility in Kitimat.“Greenhouse gas emissions are going to go through the roof with a project of this kind,” said Wilderness Committee National Campaign Director Joe Foy. “From escaped methane at the drill sites to the massive carbon emissions required to cool the gas, to more escaped methane on the long trip across the ocean to Asia and then the emissions from burning the gas. It all adds up to a big bad climate changer. How would B.C. ever meet our climate commitments with this LNG plant chugging along?”The Wilderness Committee is concerned that the proposed LNG plant would be supplied by fracked gas. Over the past decade, the Wilderness Committee has spent time in northeast British Columbia, listening to First Nations and community members’ concerns over both the massive use of and risks to freshwater resources from the fracking industry.“How can B.C. commit to ramping up this dangerous, polluting industry when the province has just announced that they will be looking at the environmental impacts of the fracking process through their scientific review?” said Foy. “Why does the government keep consulting the public and experts if they plan to go ahead as is anyway?last_img read more

Womens Tennis No 2 Ohio State defeats Virginia move forward to No

Members of the women’s tennis team huddle before their match against Virginia on March 8. Credit: Magee Sprague | Lantern reporterThe No. 2 Ohio State women’s tennis team notched the doubles point and four singles points to take down the Virginia Cavaliers 5-2 at the Varsity Tennis Center on Wednesday. The Buckeyes improved to 14-1 overall and the Cavaliers fell to 5-4. “We know Virginia is a good team,” OSU coach Melissa Schaub said. “They’ve always been a top program, so I think when you have a team like that coming into your building, you know you have to be ready.”To start things off, Buckeye senior pair Miho Kowase and Ferny Angeles Paz dominated with a quick 6-0 win over Virginia’s freshman team Hunter Bleser and Camille Favero. The No. 31 doubles team of seniors Gabriella De Santis and Sandy Niehaus was upset by Virginia’s No. 43 pair of junior Cassie Mercer and freshman Chloe Gullickson 6-2 on court one. It came down to a battle on court two between OSU’s No. 63 pairing of sophomore Francesca Di Lorenzo and junior Anna Sanford and the Cavaliers’ freshman Rosie Johanson and sophomore Meghan Kelley for the doubles point. Di Lorenzo’s final serve was returned long by the Cavaliers which secured the set 6-3 and put the home team up, 1-0. In singles play, OSU took 4-of-6 sets, thanks to Di Lorenzo, Kowase, Niehaus and Angeles Perez, each winning in two straight sets.No. 1-ranked Di Lorenzo, the Big Ten Athlete of the Week, put the first singles point on the board by dominating Virginia’s No. 75 Mercer 6-1, 6-3.Next, Niehaus took down junior Cavalier Teodora Radosavljevic 6-4, 6-3 in spite of being down 1-4 in the first set. Angeles Paz came back from a 1-3 deficit in the first set to top Favero 6-3, 6-3 on court six.With that, the Buckeyes went up 4-0 and sealed victory.“We always come ready to go and we play hard,” Angeles Paz said. “We performed really well as a team, I think that’s key. We know that every single match is going to be different and every single team is good.”For Virginia, this marked the end of a three-match win streak before heading to its second Big-10 school in one week — Michigan on Friday. Next up, OSU will travel to Orlando, Florida, to take on the No. 1 Florida Gators on March 14. “I think every match is important for us,” Schaub said. “Every match is big, we need to be ready to go.” read more

Local Brewers Raise A Toast To The New Tax Bill

first_imgBrewers are finally getting a break, from an unlikey source.  Trump’s newly signed tax bill cuts the excise tax on small brewers in half. With dozens of small brewers in Alaska and growing, this will make a positive impact on not only producers but also consumers. In 2017, Alaska had the seventh highest alcohol tax in the nation, according data compiled by the Tax Foundation. According to the Alaska Tax Division the current alcohol tax amounts to about 10 cents per drink — defined as 1 ounce of spirits, 12 ounces of beer or 5 ounces of wine. The federal government lives a different universe than the State of Alaska. Just this last session, Governor Bill Walker introduced Senate Bill 131, which would double the wholesale tax rate of beer, wine and liquor  to raise $40 million a year in revenue. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享It is a difficult thing to run a brewery in Alaska.  The greatest expense is glass, which has to be barged up from stateside, and back again if venturing into deeper market penetration. Hours are so tightly regulated that there is no way to maximize the return of square foot of your operation by using it for events where alcohol isn’t consumed during the time block the State mandates the doors are closed.  No After Hour Escape Rooms or yoga at the Brewery Tasting Room. No happy hours, slow night drink specials, or discounts – even if the proceeds go to charity. Small brewers, which include all Alaska breweries, already have an exemption that allows them to pay 35 cents per gallon, or about 3 cents per beer. Their rate would also double under the proposed bill. Story as aired:Audio PlayerDorene-on-local-brewers-raise-a-toast-to-the-new-tax-bill.mp3VmDorene-on-local-brewers-raise-a-toast-to-the-new-tax-bill.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

Significant Snowfall Expected Over The Eastern Kenai Peninsula Through Friday

first_imgIncluding the cities of Whittier, Seward, Girdwood, and Moose Pass. …POTENTIAL FOR SIGNIFICANT SNOWFALL OVER THE EASTERN KENAIPENINSULA ROAD SYSTEM THROUGH FRIDAY… Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Persistent snowfall is expected over the eastern Kenai Peninsula today through Friday. Periods of heavy snowfall and blowing snow  will significantly reduce visibility at times this afternoon  through tonight.center_img Depending on the track the low center takes, the road system from Seward to Portage could see snow accumulations anywhere from one  to three feet through Friday evening. Heaviest snowfall is expected to be from Moose Pass southward.last_img read more

Samsungs Galaxy Home Mini makes appearance in South Korean beta test

first_img4:05 A Samsung beta test website is providing our first look at the Galaxy Home Mini.  Samsung Samsung appears to have a Galaxy Home Mini after all. While we saw the product make its way through the FCC months ago, Samsung has been quiet about its smart speaker plans in recent months. Now it appears that at least one of its devices is starting to be rolled out to consumers, with the company starting up a beta in South Korea to let interested users in its home country try out the new smart speaker. The beta test, first spotted by SamMobile, also gives us our first real look at the Home Mini, which looks a lot like the larger Galaxy Home that Samsung announced last year but still hasn’t shipped. Galaxy Home Mini Samsung Beta SmartThingsSamsung’s SmartThings will be present on the Galaxy Home Mini.  Samsung We don’t know much else about the presumed Bixby-powered smart speaker, though from the beta page it’s clear that the Home Mini will work with Samsung’s SmartThings platform for controlling smart devices in your home, with infrared for controlling your TV. Interested applicants in South Korea can apply until Sunday to try to take part in the program. It remains to be seen when Samsung might release its two smart speakers and how much they’ll cost. The company didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. The battle for the best smart display: Google Home Hub… Samsung Galaxy Home Samsung’s first Bixby speaker, the Galaxy Home, revealed Preview • A Galaxy far, far away? Samsung’s Bixby speaker is still a no-show 0 Now playing: Watch this: Smart Speakers & Displays Mobile 12 Photos Share your voice Post a comment Tags News • Samsung Galaxy Home reportedly delayed to later this year Mini Samsunglast_img read more

Trump defiant despite rising outrage over border separations

first_imgIn this photo provided by US Customs and Border Protection, people who`ve been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas, Sunday, 17 June, 2018An unapologetic president Donald Trump defended his administration’s border-protection policies in the face of rising national outrage over the forced separation of migrant children from their parents. Calling for tough action against illegal immigration, Trump declared the US “will not be a migrant camp” on his watch.Images of children held in fenced cages fueled a growing chorus of condemnation from both political parties, four former first ladies and national evangelical leaders. The children are being held separately from parents who are being prosecuted under the administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy for illegal border crossings.Trump on Monday falsely blamed Democrats – the minority party in Washington – for obstructing legislation to fix the situation. In fact, it was Trump’s administration that broke with longstanding practice of processing migrant families in civil, rather than criminal, proceedings that allow families to be held together.”I say it’s very strongly the Democrats’ fault,” Trump said Monday as his administration rejected criticism that the policy has resulted in inhuman and immoral conditions.Homeland security secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said, “We will not apologise for the job we do or for the job law enforcement does, for doing the job that the American people expect us to do.”In an appearance before the National Sheriffs’ Association in New Orleans, Nielsen said: “Illegal actions have and must have consequences. No more free passes, no more get out of jail free cards.”Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after attorney general Jeff Sessions announced the new “zero-tolerance” policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution. Prior procedure had limited prosecution for many family entrants, in part because regulations prohibit detaining children with their parents since the children are not charged with a crime and the parents are.The policy change was meant to deter unlawful crossings – and Sessions issued a warning last month to those entering the US illegally that their children “inevitably for a period of time might be in different conditions.”The current holding areas have drawn widespread attention after journalists gained access to one site Sunday. At a McAllen, Texas, detention center hundreds of immigrant children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets.Audio of sobbing children calling out for their parents dominated the discussion Monday. “Papa! Papa!” one child is heard weeping in an audio file that was first reported by the nonprofit ProPublica and later provided to The Associated Press.Administration officials said they do not like the family separations either – calling it the result of legal loopholes – but insist migrants who arrive illegally simply won’t be released or loosely kept track of.”The United States will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility,” Trump declared. “Not on my watch.”Sessions, on Monday, echoed the administration’s defense of the zero tolerance policy, and called on Congress to act.”We do not want to separate parents from their children,” he said. “If we build the wall, if we pass legislation to end the lawlessness, we won’t face these terrible choices.”Mindful of the national outcry, lawmakers in both parties rushed Monday to devise a targeted legislative fix. But the White House signaled it would oppose any narrow fix aimed solely at addressing the plight of children separated from their parents under the immigration crackdown. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Trump’s priorities, like funding a border wall and tightening immigration laws, must also be fulfilled as part of any legislation.”We want to fix the whole thing,” she said. “We don’t want to tinker with just part of it.”The national debate over the family separation policy comes as Republican lawmakers are growing ever more concerned about negative effects on their re-election campaigns this fall. Trump is to travel to Capitol Hill Tuesday for a strategy session on upcoming immigration legislation.Underscoring the sensitivity of the issue, language curbing the taking of immigrant children from parents held in custody will be added to the House’s conservative immigration bill, a House GOP aide said Monday, A similar provision is already in a compromise GOP immigration measure between party conservatives and moderates, with the House expected to vote on both late this week.The administration is hoping to force Democrats to vote for the bills or bear some of the political cost in November’s midterm elections.White House officials have privately embraced the border policy as a negotiating tactic to win votes for legislation to fulfill the president’s pledge to build a border wall and to tighten the nation’s immigration laws.Trump’s commitment to the current policy showed no sign of faltering as voices of outrage and condemnation grew louder and more diverse.In Massachusetts, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker reversed a decision to send a state National Guard helicopter to the southern border, citing what he called the administration’s “cruel and inhumane” policy of separating children from their parents.The Rev. Franklin Graham, a longtime Trump ally, called the policy “disgraceful.” Several religious groups, including some conservative ones, have pushed to stop the practice of separating immigrant children from their parents. The Mormon church said it was “deeply troubled” by the separation of families and urged national leaders to find compassionate solutions.Former first lady Laura Bush called the policy “cruel” and “immoral,” and said it was “eerily reminiscent” of the US internment of Americans of Japanese descent during World War II.On Capitol Hill, Republicans joined Democrats in calling for an end to the separations. Michigan Republican Rep. Fred Upton called for an immediate end to this “ugly and inhumane practice,” adding, “It’s never acceptable to use kids as bargaining chips in political process.” Kansas GOP Sen. Pat Roberts said he is “against using parental separation as a deterrent to illegal immigration.” And GOP Rep. Mike Coffman warned, “History won’t remember well those who support the continuation of this policy.”last_img