Faculty, staff speak on the ‘Cost of Silence’ on college campuses

first_imgMembers of the Notre Dame faculty and administration discussed their experiences with diversity and how the Notre Dame community might encourage it on campus during the Cost of Silence Faculty and Staff panel Thursday night.Timothy Matovina, the chair of the theology department and former co-director of the Institute of Latino Studies, said people should not make assumptions about others, especially Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students and Latino students.“Don’t presume because someone is here from a certain background that they’re a diversity admit or that they have a lower SAT score than everyone else,” he said. “ … In my experience, they achieved at the very highest levels at the schools they’re in, which is our policy.”Matovina also said students should consider the implications of politics on some students’ personal lives, especially in light of last year’s national election.“The political is very personal,” he said. “ … [Students who came to talk to him] had no idea what the repercussions would be, and there’s still a tremendous fear. It wasn’t just a matter of political disagreement.”Brian Collier, the director of the American Indian Catholic Schools Network, said disrespecting Native Americans and their culture is not something of the past, as evidenced by two students dressing as Native Americans for their Halloween costumes during a football game this season. The students’ costumes included the headdress that is a religious symbol in some cultures, Collier said.“It’s not that people want trouble,” he said. “People don’t want their religious symbols appropriated.”Collier also said students should say something whenever they see someone misusing a culture’s symbols.For the LGBT community, Sara Agostinelli, the assistant director for LGBTQ Initiatives at the Gender Relations Center, said things are “just okay” for LGBT students on campus.“Something I hear a lot is that here at Notre Dame students feel very tolerated,” she said. “There’s not these daily acts of hate or things we might see at other institutions across the country, but there’s not a sense of welcoming, embrace and celebration.”To remedy this problem, Agostinelli recommended that students recognize the importance of allies and to reach out to students to check in on how they are doing, especially when hateful acts happen on other campuses.For an admissions perspective, Don Bishop, the associate vice president of undergraduate enrollment, said Notre Dame has made great strides in becoming more diverse due to new recruiting tactics. These tactics, Bishop said, include expanding the spring visitation program, going to new schools and working with community-based organizations.“Rather than waiting for kids to instantly know enough about Notre Dame and apply, we’re trying to go out and seek them and get a conversation with them,” he said.As a result of these efforts, Bishop said Notre Dame is on par with diversity with the average of the top 30 most selective private institutions in the U.S. He said the only categories in which Notre Dame falls behind is with Asian Americans and international students.Mary Galvin, the William K. Warren Foundation dean of the College of Science, spoke about her personal experiences. Though she is an accomplished scientist who has a Ph.D. from MIT, she said she oftentimes felt stupid since a third-grade teacher had told her parents she “wasn’t college material.”Due to her background, Galvin said she understands that many students who come to Notre Dame from schools that may not have offered AP science classes may begin to feel they are falling behind in their science and engineering courses. She said students must share their experiences with others to help them not feel bad about themselves.“If you went through the struggle of not thinking you were smart but then got out of it, be willing to talk about it,” she said.Jay Caponigro, the director of community engagement in the Office of Public Affairs, said to help solve social issues today, students must build relationships with others. To develop these partnerships, Caponigro said you must listen to people and ask them about their stories, especially by asking the question, “Why?” Caponigro also said allies must teach others to do things for themselves as well.“An ally isn’t someone who just does stuff for other people,” he said.Tags: allyship, Cost of Silence, DACA, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, LGBT, racelast_img read more

US foreclosure starts decreased in January, Vermont still among lowest

first_imgThe state of Vermont continues to have the lowest overall foreclosure rate east of the Mississippi and one of the lowest in the nation. The January Mortgage Monitor report released by Lender Processing Services, Inc. (NYSE: LPS) shows that while foreclosure starts decreased in the first month of 2011, they still outnumber foreclosure sales by almost three to one. At the same time, repeat foreclosures – loans that had cured in one way or another, but have fallen back into foreclosure – now account for more than 35 percent of foreclosure starts. As of the end of January, foreclosure inventories stood at nearly eight times historical averages (and 25 times January 2011’s level of foreclosure sales), with delinquencies more than double historical norms. January’s data also showed that the foreclosure process continues to drag out as the timelines for foreclosure starts, days in inventory and sales all continue to extend. Serious delinquencies continue to rise as well. Deterioration in the 90+-days delinquent category increased last month, for the first time since May 2010. The 90+ category has grown overall, with the largest increase in the 12+-month category as loans were removed from foreclosure. As of January 31, 2011, there are now more than 2.2 million loans 90 days or more delinquent but not yet in foreclosure, with more than 6.9 million loans in some stage of delinquency or foreclosure. As reported in LPS’ First Look release, other key results from LPS’ latest Mortgage Monitor report include: Total U.S. loan delinquency rate: 8.9 percent Total U.S. foreclosure inventory rate: 4.16 percent Total U.S. non-current* loan rate: 13.1 percent States with most non-current* loans: Florida, Nevada, Mississippi, Georgia, New Jersey States with fewest non-current* loans: Montana, Wyoming, Alaska, South Dakota, North Dakota *Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state. Note: Totals based on LPS Applied Analytics’ loan-level database of mortgage assets and are extrapolated to represent the industry. About the Mortgage Monitor LPS manages the nation’s leading repository of loan-level residential mortgage data and performance information on nearly 40 million loans across the spectrum of credit products. The company’s research experts carefully analyze this data to produce a summary supplemented by dozens of charts and graphs that reflect trend and point-in-time observations for LPS’ monthly Mortgage Monitor Report. To review the full report, visit http://www.lpsvcs.com/NEWSROOM/INDUSTRYDATA/Pages/default.aspx(link is external). About Lender Processing Services Lender Processing Services, Inc. (LPS) is a leading provider of integrated technology, services and mortgage performance data and analytics, to the mortgage and real estate industries. LPS offers solutions that span the mortgage continuum, including lead generation, origination, servicing, workflow automation (Desktop), portfolio retention and default, augmented by the company’s award-winning customer support and professional services. Approximately 50 percent of all U.S. mortgages by dollar volume are serviced using LPS’ Mortgage Servicing Package (MSP). LPS also offers proprietary mortgage and real estate data and analytics for the mortgage and capital markets industries. For more information about LPS, visit www.lpsvcs.com(link is external). JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – March 2, 2011 –last_img read more

Wellington Police Notes: Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014

first_imgWellington Police notes for Tuesday, September 30, 2014:•1:56 p.m. Officers took a report of Suspicious activity in the Wellington.•5:21 p.m. Officers took a report of a child In need of care in the 200 block, S. H, Wellington.last_img