Tapir calf with watermelonlike coat being fed at the San Diego Zoo

first_imgTapir calf with watermelon-like coat being fed at the San Diego Zoo Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: San Diego Zoo Updated: 3:40 PM KUSI Newsroom, June 27, 2018 Posted: June 27, 2018 FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The San Diego Zoo welcomed its first endangered Baird’s tapir calf in 30 years, the organization announced today. Baird’s tapirs are herbivorous mammals similar in shape to pigs, but with short trunks. Calf coats also feature spots and stripes, like the surface of a watermelon, that serve as camouflage in the dispersed light of forest floor habitats.First-time mom Luna gave birth June 13 after a 13-month gestation period, though she hasn’t provided nursing opportunities for the newborn. With no explanation for Luna’s hesitance — which also happens among other species in the animal kingdom — staff stepped in to rear the calf to ensure consistent feeding and strong health. The calf’s birth and upbringing is a valuable research opportunity, animal care manager Matt Akel said.“Animal care and veterinary staff performed ultrasounds, using protective contact, for months leading up to the calf’s birth, to identify milestones in Luna’s pregnancy and provide useful information for future pregnancies of this endangered species,” he said. “The last endangered Baird’s calf born at the zoo was in 1988, so we’re thrilled with the arrival of this male — and happy to provide him with optimal care, since mom wasn’t successful.” The calf, which weighed 22 pounds at birth, receives five bottle feedings per day. Keepers initially milked Luna to provide the calf with necessary nutrition. Now, the animal’s diet is supplemented with goat’s milk and a protein mixture. Luna and the newborn are able to interact, and staff are monitoring both animals to see if full reintroduction may eventually be possible.The calf will begin to lose his distinctive markings after a few months, eventually resembling a miniature adult before he is a year old. Visitors can see the animal in a mixed-species zoo habitat that also features capybaras and guanacos. Native to Mexico and Central America, the calves are key to maintaining biological diversity in tropical forests, according to the zoo.Tapirs disperse seeds and keep forest floors fertilized, which facilitates growth of new plants that provide food and shelter. Habitat loss and hunting have contributed to an estimated 50-percent population decline over the last 30 years. The zoo participates in a handful of projects to maintain a genetically viable species population and prevent extinction.Officials work with the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Tapir Specialist Group and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums on its Baird’s tapir Species Survival Plan. KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

Samsungs Galaxy Home Mini makes appearance in South Korean beta test

first_img4:05 A Samsung beta test website is providing our first look at the Galaxy Home Mini.  Samsung Samsung appears to have a Galaxy Home Mini after all. While we saw the product make its way through the FCC months ago, Samsung has been quiet about its smart speaker plans in recent months. Now it appears that at least one of its devices is starting to be rolled out to consumers, with the company starting up a beta in South Korea to let interested users in its home country try out the new smart speaker. The beta test, first spotted by SamMobile, also gives us our first real look at the Home Mini, which looks a lot like the larger Galaxy Home that Samsung announced last year but still hasn’t shipped. Galaxy Home Mini Samsung Beta SmartThingsSamsung’s SmartThings will be present on the Galaxy Home Mini.  Samsung We don’t know much else about the presumed Bixby-powered smart speaker, though from the beta page it’s clear that the Home Mini will work with Samsung’s SmartThings platform for controlling smart devices in your home, with infrared for controlling your TV. Interested applicants in South Korea can apply until Sunday to try to take part in the program. It remains to be seen when Samsung might release its two smart speakers and how much they’ll cost. The company didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. The battle for the best smart display: Google Home Hub… Samsung Galaxy Home Samsung’s first Bixby speaker, the Galaxy Home, revealed Preview • A Galaxy far, far away? Samsung’s Bixby speaker is still a no-show 0 Now playing: Watch this: Smart Speakers & Displays Mobile 12 Photos Share your voice Post a comment Tags News • Samsung Galaxy Home reportedly delayed to later this year Mini Samsunglast_img read more

Imran Khan facing difficulties as Pakistan PM

first_imgIn this photograph taken on 29 July 2018 supporters of former Pakistani premier Nawaz Sharif shout slogans as Sharif arrives to the cardiac centre at the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences in Islamabad. Former Pakistani premier Nawaz Sharif, jailed earlier this month over graft charges, has fallen sick inside prison and is being moved to hospital, a minister said on 29 July. — AFPPakistan’s World Cup cricket hero Imran Khan is set to become prime minister of the nuclear-armed nation of 207 million, with an economy inching toward crisis and perennial conflict on its borders.Running the country will take considerable statecraft from Khan’s relatively inexperienced party. He brings charisma, international name recognition and a sizeable election victory, though not enough to form a majority government.But critics say his star is diminished by sympathy towards extremists, and the unsportsmanlike nature of his win, which is widely alleged to have been fixed for him by Pakistan’s generals.His first challenge is cobbling together a coalition.Here is a rundown of the issues Khan and his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party will face once at the political crease.- Demagogue or democrat? -Khan has spent much of his political career as a populist agitator promising change rather than actually passing laws.”Imran Khan has been his own man. He doesn’t even go to parliament,” said political commentator Fasi Zaka. “He’s been practised in protest for five years.”PTI, meanwhile, has only ever governed in a provincial setting. The learning curve at the national level will be steep.His success could depend on the coalition his party manages to form, and whether the outgoing Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz and once-powerful Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) end up joining hands in opposition.Analysts have said it should be straightforward for Khan to form a coalition with independents and small Islamist parties, as they know he is favoured by the powerful military.But he has already created unease by pandering to Islamists during the campaign, and such a coalition could fuel fears his government will cater to the religious right.- Relations with military -To Khan’s rivals, he is the military’s “blue-eyed boy”.However he will not be the first premier to take office on good terms with the armed forces. The fate of the last elected prime minister Nawaz Sharif, once favoured by the generals only to be ousted and jailed, should prove a cautionary tale.There have long been questions over the extent to which the military, which has ruled Pakistan for roughly half its history, wanted to work with the mercurial Khan — and how much it simply wanted to install a pliant government that — unlike Sharif’s — would not challenge its power and policies.”When he wants to wield power, does it converge with the military or clash?” asked retired general and analyst Talat Masood. “I think it’s a big question mark.”- Economy -All indicators suggest Khan’s government will immediately have to approach the IMF for what would be the country’s 13th bailout from the fund.”Exports are down, debt is up, the macro indicators are pretty poor,” said Sehar Tariq with the US Institute of Peace.But an IMF bailout would likely hamper his aim of creating an Islamic welfare system, at least in the short-term.The other option may be further borrowing from China.But there are already concerns about Pakistan’s ability to hold up its end of an opaque deal that is seeing Beijing pour billions in investment into the country.- Corruption -When Khan first entered politics in the mid-90s, his goals were straightforward — rein in endemic corruption and weed out the venal political elite.But before the election he stirred controversy by bringing in so-called “electables” — politicians with huge vote banks but without clean records on corruption.Catering to theses electables and newly-minted coalition partners while trying to excise corruption may prove difficult.PTI has also vowed to force Pakistanis to pay their taxes — but there is a long way to go, with only around one percent of the population complying.”People don’t pay taxes because they see how our ruling elite spends that money,” said Khan during a victory speech last week.”I will protect the people’s tax money.”- International relations -Pakistan is surrounded by enemies, has fallen out with its tenuous ally the US and has become overly dependent on its relationship with Beijing, some analysts say.Khan has already vowed to rebalance Islamabad’s relationship with the US, months after US president Donald Trump suspended security aid over Islamabad’s alleged failure to target militancy along its borders.But, said Tariq, “the road to better relations with Pakistan and the US is not a direct road… it goes through Afghanistan.”And Afghanistan may prove a sore spot.Khan has criticised the role of the US there in the past, which is not likely to endear him to Washington now.He has also called for open borders — a stark contrast to his military’s highly-publicised efforts to build a costly fence to seal the frontier.Khan has also vowed to improve trade with arch-rival India and discuss disputed regions such as Kashmir, while reaching out to Beijing by invoking China as an example in his victory speech.last_img read more

Task Force on Arts Education Increases Awareness of State of Arts in

first_imgA new Maryland task force is seeking to create greater awareness of both the benefits of arts education as well as the current state of arts education in the state. Support for the arts ran high at a recent gathering put on by Governor Martin O’Malley’s P-20 Leadership Council Task Force on Arts Education in Maryland Schools, or AEMS, for leaders in the Baltimore business community, but some were shocked to find out just how disparate access to arts education has become, especially in places like Baltimore City. Richard Deasy, a former assistant state superintendent in Maryland who for 12 years oversaw a national coalition of arts organizations that has produced social-scientific research on the value of arts education, presented a number of findings. The arts, Deasy explained, instill capacities that are broadly transferable to other areas of life. For example, imagination, creativity, and innovation are all central to entrepreneurship and thus economic vibrancy. Deasy told the AFRO that, because public schools have always been training grounds for the support of the American economy, business leaders have significant clout in terms of what ultimately gets taught in schools. “They are the voices of what the economy needs and they know that they are not happy with the skills that they’re seeing emerging,” said Deasy. “They need to weigh in and not just say to somebody ‘you gotta do this better.’ They have to come in and be part of discussing the solutions . . . since they’re all arguing for creativity.” While the importance of arts education seemed to be broadly accepted by those present, some in the audience were shocked to find out that some children in Baltimore City schools receive no arts education whatsoever through their middle school years. Responding to a question from an audience member who asked what it meant to say that some kids in Baltimore City receive “zero art,” Mary Cary, executive director of the AEMS Alliance said, “It means that your child could go to a school and really—elementary through middle—and never have music or dance or theater or visual arts or media arts.” Maryland requires that students have at least one arts education credit in order to graduate from high school, the only assurance that all Baltimore City youth will have at least some contact with arts education. While there are regulations in the state of Maryland that require arts education at all levels, because many schools do not have arts faculty, the regulations are simply not followed. For Navasha Daya, a recording artist who founded the Youth Resiliency Institute with her husband; an arts education organization that helps fill the void left by the dearth of arts education in Baltimore public schools and emphasizes culturally relevant arts education, the fact that some kids in the state receive regular arts education while others do not is an equity issue. “Baltimore is 69 percent Black and the fact that there is no art in certain schools is very unfair and I feel that there needs to be an accountability for regulations in regards to what is required for student’s education, that art is a basic need for all children.” For Mary Ann Mears, a sculptor, arts advocate, and member of the AEMS task force, it comes down to a school leadership that is invested in the importance of arts education. “I live in the city and I’m appalled when I see what some kids aren’t getting that they could get,” said Mears. “And we’re a great arts city and we have people who are dying to help and it comes down to whether or not you have a leader in the school building, a principal in the school, who is saying we need the arts, and they hire arts teachers.”last_img read more

Ball lightning may sometimes be explained as hallucinations

first_img The scientists, Alexander Kendl and Joseph Peer from the University of Innsbruck, analyzed electromagnetic pulses of repetitive lightning discharges and compared them to the magnetic fields used in clinical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Their results suggest the variable magnetic fields produced by lightning are in the same order of magnitude and frequency as those applied in TMS that stimulate hallucinations, such as balls of light known as cranial phosphenes. They postulate that balls of light known as ball lightning, which are occasionally reported during thunder and lightning storms, could often be hallucinations arising from lightning electromagnetic pulses affecting the brains of close observers.Ball lightning was first reported in St. Petersburg in Russia in 1754 by a Dr. Richmann, who was attempting to copy Benjamin Franklin’s kite-lightning experiment, and who was instantly killed by the lightning. It is rarely seen and photographic evidence is almost nonexistent. There are dozens of theories of how ball lightning could form, including the burning of hot silicon particles produced when a lightning strike vaporizes the ground.TMS is a non-invasive method of stimulating areas of the brain, and is used in psychiatric treatments and in studying the brain. It is known that when the visual cortex is stimulated by pulsed magnetic fields in TMS, patients will sometimes see hallucinations of luminous shapes in their visual field. With the stimulation coils attached to the head, the visions can occur with single or repeated pulses at frequencies of around 1-50 Hz. The cortical phosphenes appear as bubbles, lines, ovals or patches of either white or a variety of colors. When the stimulation coil is moved, the phosphenes also appear to move. Rare but natural long (1-2 seconds) repetitive lightning strikes produce electromagnetic pulses, which the researchers thought might produce currents within the brain in the same order of magnitude in terms of duration, strength and frequency as in TMS in observers 20-100 meters away from the lightning strike. They calculated the time-varying electromagnetic fields of various types of lightning strikes for observers at various distances from the strike.The calculations showed that only lightning strikes consisting of multiple return strokes at the same point over a period of seconds could produce a magnetic field long enough to cause cortical phosphenes. This type would account for around 1-5% of lightning strikes, but very few of these would be seen by an observer 20 to 100 m away, and of those the researchers estimate seeing the light for seconds would occur only in about one percent of unharmed observers. The observer does not need to be outside, but could be inside an aircraft or building. Kendl and Peer also said an observer would be most likely to classify the experience as ball lightning because of preconceptions. Citation: Ball lightning may sometimes be explained as hallucinations (2010, May 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-05-ball-lightning-hallucinations.html A New Kind Of Lightning Discovered Electric field transcranially induced at various observation points (from bottom to top: 20 – 100m distance from strike point) by the time derivative of the lightning magnetic field during the decline phase of an average negative cloud-to-ground subsequent return stroke. Phosphene perception can be expected for induced fields above 20 V/m. Long duration repetitive stimulation of phosphenes up to seconds can be caused by higher multiplicity strokes. See arXiv:1005.1153v1 paper for details. (PhysOrg.com) — Physicists in Austria have calculated the magnetic fields associated with certain types of lightning strikes are powerful enough to create hallucinations of hovering balls of light in nearby observers, and that these visions would be interpreted as ball lightning. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further More information: J. Peer, A. Kendl: Transcranial stimulability of phosphenes by long lightning electromagnetic pulses, arXiv:1005.1153v1 [physics.med-ph] arxiv.org/abs/1005.1153 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more