Lecture examines origin of “Blessed are the poor”

first_imgNotre Dame law professor John Finnis posed the question, “Who Said, ‘Blessed are the Poor’?” in a lecture Friday at the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture’s 15th Annual Fall Conference entitled “Your Light Will Rise in the Darkness: Responding to the Cry of the Poor.”Finnis said the answer to the lecture’s titular question can be found by exploring the differences between the Gospels of Luke and Matthew.“The firm answer [to the question, who said, “Blessed are the Poor?”] is given by the Gospel [of] Luke,” Finnis said.Finnis said Jesus clearly that addresses not only the poor, but also his disciples, when he compares the destitute and hungry to the rich.“What [Jesus] promised the poor was not social justice,” Finnis said. “What he was — and is — holding out is the short hope of a place of Kingdom of God — not now, but as a great reward in heaven.”Finnis said “blessed are the poor” with “blessed are the poor in spirit” are found in distinct accounts of the gospels.“The Gospel according to Matthew describes similar blessings in the Beatitudes,” he said.  “Notice in his account that the poverty in the third and fourth Beatitudes are spiritual. Do not care for riches. Lay up your treasures in heaven. You cannot serve two masters in God and wealth.”Luke cautions readers of his gospel about the vices wealth may spawn.“In the context of warning, [Luke] cautioned against avarice,” Finnis said.  “… The poor in Luke’s straightforward sense is what the poor in spirit are to experience, that is the good news of the gospel — there is a treasure in heaven.“So, did Jesus say, blessed are the ‘poor’ or ‘poor in spirit?’ The two evangelists are reporting the same sermon.  Both contain —in the same order — love your enemies, judge not others, but it seems clear one account is not derived from the other and they’re not from the same source.  Two different reports on one sermon.”Finnis cited theologian John Chapman and said, “There is no reason to doubt that Jesus on inaugural sermon said both.”“While Luke’s Beatitudes may represent the fiery, original words, Matthew spiritualized them, making them applicable to the spiritual needs of others,” Finnis said. “Gospels are not eyewitness testimonies all the time, but each evangelist has arranged the accounts to address the spiritual needs of the community they are a part of.“One can forge a good argument from discontinuity for the core Beatitudes — in spirit can represent the Beatitudes in the communities. As for the other Beatitudes, they are parallel to the form and function of the work of Jesus.“Those Beatitudes may be referred to be authentic.”Tags: beatitudes, blessed are the poor, blessed are the poor in spirit, Gospel, Luke, Matthew, poor, poor in spiritlast_img read more

Three things we learned today at the WCup

first_img0Shares0000Leading by a head: Cristiano Ronaldo leads the Golden Boot race with four goals © AFP / YURI CORTEZSAINT PETERSBURG, Russian Federation, Jun 20 – The World Cup produced three tight games on Wednesday as Portugal, Spain and Uruguay won but once again the favourites failed to shine.It was three of the world’s top marksmen who did get on the scoresheet, though, as Cristiano Ronaldo and Diego Costa continued their fight for the Golden Boot, while Luis Suarez scored in his third World Cup. AFP Sports looks at three things we learned today at the World Cup.Ronaldo eyes more goldFew goalscoring titles still elude Ronaldo and he may soon have one more to add to his collection after netting for the fourth time in two games against Morocco to move out in front in the race for the World Cup Golden Boot.Ronaldo has now already scored more goals in Russia than his three previous World Cup campaigns.Having spearheaded Real Madrid’s run to a third consecutive Champions League, Ronaldo’s fast start to the tournament also puts him in pole position for a sixth Ballon d’Or — to finally move ahead of Lionel Messi’s five.Messi missed a penalty in Argentina’s opener, while fitness issues for Neymar and Mohamed Salah have blighted their challenge to Ronaldo’s crown.The competition is not even a week old, but the World Player of the Year’s message is clear: “Catch me if you can.”Uruguay, Russia roll onThey did it in very differing fashion but Uruguay and Russia became the first sides to book their places in the last 16 after the South Americans edged past Saudi Arabia with their second 1-0 win of the tournament.By contrast, Russia have been rampant in scoring eight goals to reach the knockout phase for the first time since the Soviet era.Blessed with one of the most feared strike forces in Russia in Suarez and Edinson Cavani, more was expected from the Celeste against a Saudi side that shipped five to Russia in the tournament opener.However, Uruguay know how to negotiate their way through a tournament under 71-year-old Oscar Tabarez and with Atletico Madrid duo Diego Godin and Jose Maria Gimenez marshalling their defence, they will be a tough opponent for, most likely, Spain or Portugal in the last 16.Spain glad to have CostaSince switching allegiances from the country of his birth, Brazil, to play for Spain ahead of the 2014 World Cup, Costa has not always seemed the perfect fit for La Roja’s tiki-taka style.So far in Russia, though, Costa is keeping Spain afloat by adding a dimension to their play not seen in past tournamentsHe bullied Pepe and fired home from close range at the end of a well-worked set-piece to score a double in a thrilling 3-3 draw against Portugal.And Costa moved to within one goal of Ronaldo in fortunate fashion as a clearance ricocheted off him and into the Iranian net as Spain survived a huge scare in Kazan.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more