SeaWorld offers new inside look of animal exhibits

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)- SeaWorld offers shows, rides and attractions but have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes of their animal exhibits? SeaWorld’s new Inside Look gives guests the chance to see what the vets see, go where the rescuers go, and learn for themselves hoe San Diego’s premier marine-life park cares for thousands of animals every day.KUSI’s Allie Wagner was there to get a sneak peak of their new program. SeaWorld offers new inside look of animal exhibits KUSI Newsroom Posted: January 4, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter January 4, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

Samsungs Galaxy Home Mini makes appearance in South Korean beta test

first_img4:05 A Samsung beta test website is providing our first look at the Galaxy Home Mini.  Samsung Samsung appears to have a Galaxy Home Mini after all. While we saw the product make its way through the FCC months ago, Samsung has been quiet about its smart speaker plans in recent months. Now it appears that at least one of its devices is starting to be rolled out to consumers, with the company starting up a beta in South Korea to let interested users in its home country try out the new smart speaker. The beta test, first spotted by SamMobile, also gives us our first real look at the Home Mini, which looks a lot like the larger Galaxy Home that Samsung announced last year but still hasn’t shipped. Galaxy Home Mini Samsung Beta SmartThingsSamsung’s SmartThings will be present on the Galaxy Home Mini.  Samsung We don’t know much else about the presumed Bixby-powered smart speaker, though from the beta page it’s clear that the Home Mini will work with Samsung’s SmartThings platform for controlling smart devices in your home, with infrared for controlling your TV. Interested applicants in South Korea can apply until Sunday to try to take part in the program. It remains to be seen when Samsung might release its two smart speakers and how much they’ll cost. The company didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. The battle for the best smart display: Google Home Hub… Samsung Galaxy Home Samsung’s first Bixby speaker, the Galaxy Home, revealed Preview • A Galaxy far, far away? Samsung’s Bixby speaker is still a no-show 0 Now playing: Watch this: Smart Speakers & Displays Mobile 12 Photos Share your voice Post a comment Tags News • Samsung Galaxy Home reportedly delayed to later this year Mini Samsunglast_img read more

After Harvey Is Houston Heeding The Call To Change Its Growth Model

first_img Listen For decades, the story of Houston has been of growth – growth that sometimes meant Houston led the nation in creating jobs and in gaining new residents.But what if in coming decades that growth slows or stops?A new report commissioned by the Center for Houston’s Future raises concerns.It found three big factors that could limit growth: not enough educated workers, a diminishing oil industry, and a region plagued by too much traffic and too little done to prevent flooding.In the first of three installments, News 88.7 looks at specifically how flooding could stymie growth in the decades ahead.Houston has long been known as a business-friendly city with few regulations and of course, no zoning.“Discover the unlimited opportunities awaiting you in Houston: the city with no limits,” narrates a video as part of the Greater Houston Partnership’s City with No Limits marketing campaign, underscored by positive, dramatic music.But how “limitless” should Houston be after the destruction Harvey caused last summer?That’s a question policy makers have been asking themselves a lot lately.Stephen Klineberg is a sociologist at Rice University and author of the annual Houston Area Survey. He says at least twice before did Houstonians experience wake-up calls that led to changes in how things are done here.The first was in 1999 when Houston made national news as the nation’s smog capital. The second was in 2002, when Houston lost its bid to host the 2012 Olympics. The reasoning: Houston was too ugly. “Got the business world’s attention, major improvements in quality of life in the city and Discovery Green and Buffalo Bayou Greenways Initiative,” Klineberg said. “Will Harvey be a wake-up call like that?”If you ask Houstonians, it may have been. The Houston Area Survey revealed two-thirds believe stricter regulations would have reduced the damage from Harvey. Seventy-one percent want to prohibit new construction in flood-prone areas.“It’s not a question of alternatives to growth but of alternative ways of growing,” Klineberg said. “How do we grow in a way that makes us more resilient, less prone to flooding, more attractive to the people who we need to attract into this city.”The city of Houston, for one, has been working on more stringent building regulations.The City Council recently passed changes to its Chapter 19 floodplain ordinance. Starting in the fall, new construction must be built at least two feet above the 500-year floodplain.“We want you to build, we want you to develop in the city of Houston,” Mayor Sylvester Turner said. “But we have to do it in a more resilient manner.”In another vote on April 25, the City Council hammered home its willingness to balance its business friendliness with the need to do more to prevent the impact from flooding.In a unanimous vote, council members supported a developer’s plan to build homes in a west Houston floodplain.Jim Blackburn, co-director of Rice University’s severe storm center, or SSPEED Center, calls it a bad decision.He said it’s a sign that Houston is not quite where it should be in this post-Harvey world.“Nothing less than our economic prosperity is at stake,” he said. “I just don’t think it’s being perceived that way. And I think that’s where I talk about the fact that there’s an urgency to addressing these problems. There’s a need for a vision and there’s a need for leadership that I have not seen so far.”That’s echoed by that report by the Center for Houston’s Future. It warns that the city’s existing growth model is not sustainable. “Flooding is only one of our problems,” Brett Perlman, the Center’s CEO, said. “We need to look at a broader definition of resilience to understand that there might be other shocks – cybersecurity, coastal storm surge, drought – that need to be dealt with.”The report suggests looking at what other cities have done to deal with similar challenges.For example, after the 1989 earthquake, San Francisco redesigned some of its infrastructure.In part 2 of this series, we’ll look at how Houston’s dependence on oil and gas may have to change for the city to remain on top. Share Xcenter_img Wikimedia CommonsDowntown Houston, the I-45 freeway and Buffalo Bayou, taken from Sabine Street. 00:00 /04:02 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

NPR Has Turned Wait Wait Dont Tell Me Into a Game for

first_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Popular on Variety The weekly 5-minute quiz has been developed by NPR in partnership with Vaynersmart, the internet of things subsidiary Gary Vaynerchuk’s Vaynermedia. NPR recently estimated that 53 million people, or 21% of the adult U.S. population, now own a smart speaker.center_img NPR has turned its popular “Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!” news quiz show into an interactive game for smart speakers: Owners of speakers powered by Google’s Assistant or Amazon Alexa will be able to play along to questions about the news of the week.Just like the radio show, the quiz is being hosted by Peter Sagal and Bill Kurtis. And just like on the show, participants can actually win a chance to have one of the show’s on-air talent personalize their voicemail.Owners of an Amazon Echo device can access the quiz by saying “Alexa, open Wait Wait Quiz,” whereas it’s available on Google Home speakers via the voice command “Hey Google, talk to the Wait Wait Quiz.”“Try it out today– you can’t lose! Well, technically you can,” NPR joked in a press release for the game. The network also had “All Things Considered co-host Ari Shapiro try out the quiz on camera:last_img read more

4 Ways to Prepare for the Next Apocalyptic Amazon Web Services Outage

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. How Success Happens Listen Now Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. You probably heard about the outage in late February that hit Amazon Web Services (AWS), the company’s cloud-computing service. Amazon is the country’s largest service provider of cloud computing for businesses, and thousands of websites and apps that rely on its services found themselves in freak-out mode due to the interruption.What happened was this: Amazon’s Simple Storage Service (S3) went down; and, instantly, Amazon clients couldn’t access all kinds of things they’d stored remotely on the company’s servers — everything from images to customer transaction data.Related: When Amazon Makes a Mistake, Expect a Prompt, Overly Detailed ResponseThe cause of the outage was eventually identified as human error, and the chaos was compounded by the fact that other AWS services rely on S3 for storage. And the danger is not over: In spite of Amazon’s being known for its very reliable track record, just such an outage will inevitably happen again.That’s why small businesses must learn from past mistakes and be ready for the next outage that comes along.The scars remainBecause so many businesses rely on S3 — more than 148,000 websites, according to TechCrunch — the outage had far-reaching ramifications, from small inconveniences to the complete erosion of business models and revenue drivers.Popular image- and link-sharing site Pinterest uses AWS, which meant that during the outage, everyone from soon-to-be brides keeping track of their favorite wedding decorations, to 18-year-olds recording their burgeoning tattoo ideas,was unable to build their libraries. While this doesn’t seem too terribly consequential, it’s evidence of how an outage can directly affect the lives of millions of users.Any company that, say, chose to build its entire infrastructure on Amazon undoubtedly experienced a little bit of panic when its logins ceased to work. Data feeds of hotel prices, user activity, photographs, favorited sites and product offers delivered only a spinning wheel of death for those who attempted to load them. Few were spared — not Business Insider or Giphy, or countless IoT-connected thermostats and lightbulbs.Hope for the futureLuckily, Amazon was able to get its systems back on track in relatively short order. But its previous image as an immovable, unbreakable pillar in the hosting community no doubt suffered. Moreover, the incident got the attention of quite a few developers and helped them realize that having a backup plan is probably a decent strategy.Related: 5 Vital Considerations When Choosing Your Web Hosting Service If you’re one of these developers or the leader of a small business, pay attention to the tips below while formulating your plan.1. Divide the duties. Make sure your hosted scripts aren’t solely reliant on one service. Handing your entire operation over to an outside service — such as Microsoft or Amazon — will cut you off from the necessary controls that allow you to address threats or outages when they occur.If your budget allows, set up more than one hosting service in case the primary source falls through. Simple checks can ensure that if the original source isn’t available, a fallback to another host — or even a locally hosted source — can keep your site running.2. Rack up redundancies. If your entire project really is reliant on AWS capabilities, the alternative is to build up a secondary source — hosted elsewhere — to operate in a redundant fashion. This way, when one service goes down, the product can keep moving along, with little to no interruption.Of course, the difficulty of this is monumental. While Microsoft Azure or Google offers comparatively robust packages for scaling, the way these operate is often significantly different than AWS does. Many of the items that come prebuilt with AWS simply won’t be available on Google or other services. This means you’ll either need to invest in extensive custom development to create similar functionality or set a preplanned goal to limit your system’s reliance on AWS-specific capabilities.3. Fancify your failures. Even with the strongest precautions in place, the occasional outage is inevitable. In this event, make sure your failure points are graceful. When a user gets an ugly AWS message that’s practically indecipherable, it creates a feeling of panic and anxiety. Instead, plan for these types of situations with useful, friendly and self-effacing messages that actually give the user an idea of what’s happening.For example, if my website at Rocksauce Studios goes down, users aren’t faced with a vomit of incomprehensible code. Instead, a friendly message pops up saying, “Oops!” before offering users the ability to either try again or contact our support team for help. Not only does this show our awareness of the problem, but it also offers an avenue for users to reach out for a fix.4. Give the gift of gab. Be ready to communicate with your users. This is perhaps the most important factor because having a completely independent back-up system — whether you’re a company such as Netflix or a small bootstrapping startup — is an extreme solution, given the presumably rare nature of the problem. Instead, having a well-formed response to send to users via email, Twitter, Facebook or other means can provide you with the necessary grace. Responding promptly to customer inquiries, even when you don’t have the answer, goes a long way toward showing that you care about your customers and are aware of the problem.Related: Does Your Website Have a Crash Plan?The reliability of cloud hosting services is measured in “uptime,” or the amount of time these services are working and available. Most companies do everything possible to keep their uptime as close to 100 percent as they can, meaning they’re not likely to experience regular outages any time soon. That being said, taking a few simple precautionary measures can go a long way toward easing the pains of an outage should one happen to hit your hosting services in the future. 6 min read May 22, 2017last_img read more