All hands on deck Royal Bahamas Defence Force marines summoned to HQ

first_img Related Items:#HurricaneIrma, #magneticmedianews, rbdf August 30th – One Year since Hurricane Irma named Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, September 5th, 2017 – Nassau –  The Royal Bahamas Defence Force is calling for all hands on deck and members were asked to report for duty, that includes marines on study leave also.  It was explained that all vacation leave for the RBDF has been cancelled and members are to report to headquarters at the Coral Harbour base this morning.  Even those on study leave are called back in as The Bahamas braces for an encounter with a possible Category 5 hurricane, by the time Irma reaches our shores on Thursday. By Deandrea Hamilton Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Bahamas joint effort recovers more bodies of Haitian migrants FortisTCI announces bid to hike electricity bills, cites record $42m response to hurricanes as destabilizinglast_img read more

SeaWorld offers new inside look of animal exhibits

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)- SeaWorld offers shows, rides and attractions but have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes of their animal exhibits? SeaWorld’s new Inside Look gives guests the chance to see what the vets see, go where the rescuers go, and learn for themselves hoe San Diego’s premier marine-life park cares for thousands of animals every day.KUSI’s Allie Wagner was there to get a sneak peak of their new program. SeaWorld offers new inside look of animal exhibits KUSI Newsroom Posted: January 4, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter January 4, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

Samsungs Galaxy Home Mini makes appearance in South Korean beta test

first_img4:05 A Samsung beta test website is providing our first look at the Galaxy Home Mini.  Samsung Samsung appears to have a Galaxy Home Mini after all. While we saw the product make its way through the FCC months ago, Samsung has been quiet about its smart speaker plans in recent months. Now it appears that at least one of its devices is starting to be rolled out to consumers, with the company starting up a beta in South Korea to let interested users in its home country try out the new smart speaker. The beta test, first spotted by SamMobile, also gives us our first real look at the Home Mini, which looks a lot like the larger Galaxy Home that Samsung announced last year but still hasn’t shipped. Galaxy Home Mini Samsung Beta SmartThingsSamsung’s SmartThings will be present on the Galaxy Home Mini.  Samsung We don’t know much else about the presumed Bixby-powered smart speaker, though from the beta page it’s clear that the Home Mini will work with Samsung’s SmartThings platform for controlling smart devices in your home, with infrared for controlling your TV. Interested applicants in South Korea can apply until Sunday to try to take part in the program. It remains to be seen when Samsung might release its two smart speakers and how much they’ll cost. The company didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. The battle for the best smart display: Google Home Hub… Samsung Galaxy Home Samsung’s first Bixby speaker, the Galaxy Home, revealed Preview • A Galaxy far, far away? Samsung’s Bixby speaker is still a no-show 0 Now playing: Watch this: Smart Speakers & Displays Mobile 12 Photos Share your voice Post a comment Tags News • Samsung Galaxy Home reportedly delayed to later this year Mini Samsunglast_img read more

Pakistan bus crash kills 26

first_imgRoad Accident logoAt least 26 people were killed and 46 others injured when a passenger bus plunged into a ravine in northern Pakistan, police said Thursday.The crash took place near Dhok Pathan village, some 115 kilometres (70 miles) southwest of the capital Islamabad late Wednesday.”At least 26 people have died and 46 others were injured when a passenger bus lost control at a slope and veered off into a deep ravine,” local police official Fazal Abbas told AFP.The bus was carrying members of Tableeghi Jamaat — a Sunni evangelical group — from the northwestern town of Kohat to the eastern city of Raiwind, near Lahore where their annual gathering was taking place, he added.Abbas said that most of the injured were discharged from hospital after receiving medical treatment, but at least 10 seriously wounded passengers were sent to Rawalpindi, a garrison city adjoining the capital Islamabad.Officials added that the bus was not driving on its usual route when it crashed and was plying hilly roads after another motorway had been closed due to dense fog and traffic.A local government official confirmed the accident and toll.Pakistan has one of the world’s worst records for fatal traffic accidents, many of them blamed on poor roads, badly maintained vehicles and reckless driving.last_img read more

Trump defiant despite rising outrage over border separations

first_imgIn this photo provided by US Customs and Border Protection, people who`ve been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas, Sunday, 17 June, 2018An unapologetic president Donald Trump defended his administration’s border-protection policies in the face of rising national outrage over the forced separation of migrant children from their parents. Calling for tough action against illegal immigration, Trump declared the US “will not be a migrant camp” on his watch.Images of children held in fenced cages fueled a growing chorus of condemnation from both political parties, four former first ladies and national evangelical leaders. The children are being held separately from parents who are being prosecuted under the administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy for illegal border crossings.Trump on Monday falsely blamed Democrats – the minority party in Washington – for obstructing legislation to fix the situation. In fact, it was Trump’s administration that broke with longstanding practice of processing migrant families in civil, rather than criminal, proceedings that allow families to be held together.”I say it’s very strongly the Democrats’ fault,” Trump said Monday as his administration rejected criticism that the policy has resulted in inhuman and immoral conditions.Homeland security secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said, “We will not apologise for the job we do or for the job law enforcement does, for doing the job that the American people expect us to do.”In an appearance before the National Sheriffs’ Association in New Orleans, Nielsen said: “Illegal actions have and must have consequences. No more free passes, no more get out of jail free cards.”Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after attorney general Jeff Sessions announced the new “zero-tolerance” policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution. Prior procedure had limited prosecution for many family entrants, in part because regulations prohibit detaining children with their parents since the children are not charged with a crime and the parents are.The policy change was meant to deter unlawful crossings – and Sessions issued a warning last month to those entering the US illegally that their children “inevitably for a period of time might be in different conditions.”The current holding areas have drawn widespread attention after journalists gained access to one site Sunday. At a McAllen, Texas, detention center hundreds of immigrant children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets.Audio of sobbing children calling out for their parents dominated the discussion Monday. “Papa! Papa!” one child is heard weeping in an audio file that was first reported by the nonprofit ProPublica and later provided to The Associated Press.Administration officials said they do not like the family separations either – calling it the result of legal loopholes – but insist migrants who arrive illegally simply won’t be released or loosely kept track of.”The United States will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility,” Trump declared. “Not on my watch.”Sessions, on Monday, echoed the administration’s defense of the zero tolerance policy, and called on Congress to act.”We do not want to separate parents from their children,” he said. “If we build the wall, if we pass legislation to end the lawlessness, we won’t face these terrible choices.”Mindful of the national outcry, lawmakers in both parties rushed Monday to devise a targeted legislative fix. But the White House signaled it would oppose any narrow fix aimed solely at addressing the plight of children separated from their parents under the immigration crackdown. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Trump’s priorities, like funding a border wall and tightening immigration laws, must also be fulfilled as part of any legislation.”We want to fix the whole thing,” she said. “We don’t want to tinker with just part of it.”The national debate over the family separation policy comes as Republican lawmakers are growing ever more concerned about negative effects on their re-election campaigns this fall. Trump is to travel to Capitol Hill Tuesday for a strategy session on upcoming immigration legislation.Underscoring the sensitivity of the issue, language curbing the taking of immigrant children from parents held in custody will be added to the House’s conservative immigration bill, a House GOP aide said Monday, A similar provision is already in a compromise GOP immigration measure between party conservatives and moderates, with the House expected to vote on both late this week.The administration is hoping to force Democrats to vote for the bills or bear some of the political cost in November’s midterm elections.White House officials have privately embraced the border policy as a negotiating tactic to win votes for legislation to fulfill the president’s pledge to build a border wall and to tighten the nation’s immigration laws.Trump’s commitment to the current policy showed no sign of faltering as voices of outrage and condemnation grew louder and more diverse.In Massachusetts, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker reversed a decision to send a state National Guard helicopter to the southern border, citing what he called the administration’s “cruel and inhumane” policy of separating children from their parents.The Rev. Franklin Graham, a longtime Trump ally, called the policy “disgraceful.” Several religious groups, including some conservative ones, have pushed to stop the practice of separating immigrant children from their parents. The Mormon church said it was “deeply troubled” by the separation of families and urged national leaders to find compassionate solutions.Former first lady Laura Bush called the policy “cruel” and “immoral,” and said it was “eerily reminiscent” of the US internment of Americans of Japanese descent during World War II.On Capitol Hill, Republicans joined Democrats in calling for an end to the separations. Michigan Republican Rep. Fred Upton called for an immediate end to this “ugly and inhumane practice,” adding, “It’s never acceptable to use kids as bargaining chips in political process.” Kansas GOP Sen. Pat Roberts said he is “against using parental separation as a deterrent to illegal immigration.” And GOP Rep. Mike Coffman warned, “History won’t remember well those who support the continuation of this policy.”last_img

Imran Khan facing difficulties as Pakistan PM

first_imgIn this photograph taken on 29 July 2018 supporters of former Pakistani premier Nawaz Sharif shout slogans as Sharif arrives to the cardiac centre at the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences in Islamabad. Former Pakistani premier Nawaz Sharif, jailed earlier this month over graft charges, has fallen sick inside prison and is being moved to hospital, a minister said on 29 July. — AFPPakistan’s World Cup cricket hero Imran Khan is set to become prime minister of the nuclear-armed nation of 207 million, with an economy inching toward crisis and perennial conflict on its borders.Running the country will take considerable statecraft from Khan’s relatively inexperienced party. He brings charisma, international name recognition and a sizeable election victory, though not enough to form a majority government.But critics say his star is diminished by sympathy towards extremists, and the unsportsmanlike nature of his win, which is widely alleged to have been fixed for him by Pakistan’s generals.His first challenge is cobbling together a coalition.Here is a rundown of the issues Khan and his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party will face once at the political crease.- Demagogue or democrat? -Khan has spent much of his political career as a populist agitator promising change rather than actually passing laws.”Imran Khan has been his own man. He doesn’t even go to parliament,” said political commentator Fasi Zaka. “He’s been practised in protest for five years.”PTI, meanwhile, has only ever governed in a provincial setting. The learning curve at the national level will be steep.His success could depend on the coalition his party manages to form, and whether the outgoing Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz and once-powerful Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) end up joining hands in opposition.Analysts have said it should be straightforward for Khan to form a coalition with independents and small Islamist parties, as they know he is favoured by the powerful military.But he has already created unease by pandering to Islamists during the campaign, and such a coalition could fuel fears his government will cater to the religious right.- Relations with military -To Khan’s rivals, he is the military’s “blue-eyed boy”.However he will not be the first premier to take office on good terms with the armed forces. The fate of the last elected prime minister Nawaz Sharif, once favoured by the generals only to be ousted and jailed, should prove a cautionary tale.There have long been questions over the extent to which the military, which has ruled Pakistan for roughly half its history, wanted to work with the mercurial Khan — and how much it simply wanted to install a pliant government that — unlike Sharif’s — would not challenge its power and policies.”When he wants to wield power, does it converge with the military or clash?” asked retired general and analyst Talat Masood. “I think it’s a big question mark.”- Economy -All indicators suggest Khan’s government will immediately have to approach the IMF for what would be the country’s 13th bailout from the fund.”Exports are down, debt is up, the macro indicators are pretty poor,” said Sehar Tariq with the US Institute of Peace.But an IMF bailout would likely hamper his aim of creating an Islamic welfare system, at least in the short-term.The other option may be further borrowing from China.But there are already concerns about Pakistan’s ability to hold up its end of an opaque deal that is seeing Beijing pour billions in investment into the country.- Corruption -When Khan first entered politics in the mid-90s, his goals were straightforward — rein in endemic corruption and weed out the venal political elite.But before the election he stirred controversy by bringing in so-called “electables” — politicians with huge vote banks but without clean records on corruption.Catering to theses electables and newly-minted coalition partners while trying to excise corruption may prove difficult.PTI has also vowed to force Pakistanis to pay their taxes — but there is a long way to go, with only around one percent of the population complying.”People don’t pay taxes because they see how our ruling elite spends that money,” said Khan during a victory speech last week.”I will protect the people’s tax money.”- International relations -Pakistan is surrounded by enemies, has fallen out with its tenuous ally the US and has become overly dependent on its relationship with Beijing, some analysts say.Khan has already vowed to rebalance Islamabad’s relationship with the US, months after US president Donald Trump suspended security aid over Islamabad’s alleged failure to target militancy along its borders.But, said Tariq, “the road to better relations with Pakistan and the US is not a direct road… it goes through Afghanistan.”And Afghanistan may prove a sore spot.Khan has criticised the role of the US there in the past, which is not likely to endear him to Washington now.He has also called for open borders — a stark contrast to his military’s highly-publicised efforts to build a costly fence to seal the frontier.Khan has also vowed to improve trade with arch-rival India and discuss disputed regions such as Kashmir, while reaching out to Beijing by invoking China as an example in his victory speech.last_img read more

Anger over Harvey May Not Carry Through to Midterms

first_imgThere are still voters around Houston who were directly affected by Harvey and who haven’t yet recovered. Rice University political scientist Mark Jones said they’re likely to have a bad taste in their mouth toward all incumbents. But he said that, at this point, most voters are more fatalistic than angry, seeing little that any one politician can do against flooding.“So if Democrats such as Lizzie Fletcher and Lina Hidalgo were thinking that they’d be able to capitalize on Harvey to win votes in the Houston metro region,” Jones said, “they’re likely to find themselves being very disappointed.”Fletcher has made Harvey one of the central issues in her campaign against Republican incumbent Congressman John Culberson. Hidalgo is running against Harris County Judge Ed Emmett. Jones said that Emmett won high marks for his handling of the storm and that, if anything, Harvey is likely to work in his favor. X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen Sharecenter_img 00:00 /00:53 Texas Military DepartmentTexas National Guard troops help rescue people from flooded homes in Houston during Hurricane Harvey.Numerous Houston-area Democrats running for office this year are blaming incumbent Republicans for the slow pace of action on Harvey relief and flood mitigation. It looked like a winning strategy in the months after the storm. Now, it’s beginning to look like a miscalculation. last_img read more