Run to raise awareness for eating disorders

first_imgTags: eating disorder, Fun Run, Kathryn Schultz, Molly Cullinan, NEDA, NEDA Fun Run The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) two-mile Fun Run and Walk takes place Friday at 1 p.m. in front of Rockne Memorial. The run is free for all participants.NEDA, founded in 2001, is the United States’ leading non-profit organization aimed at raising awareness of eating disorders, according to its website. NEDA works to support those affected by eating disorders, work toward the prevention of eating disorders and improve access to treatment for those affected.The run will begin at the Rockne and continue to Angela Boulevard and around Main Circle.Juniors Katie Schultz and Molly Cullinan are part of the student team that planned out the logistics of the run.“We’ve been working on [the run] for about a month,” Cullinan said. “We originally wanted to do the lakes … but that wasn’t feasible. Mapping the run and figuring out an actual feasible distance was the hardest part of it.”The NEDA Fun Run coincides with the University’s Love Your Body Week, as well as National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.“We’re trying to raise awareness for eating disorders, because it’s a problem that is widespread but not talked about often,” Cullinan said.Schultz said one of NEDA’s goals is to focus on and debunk misconceptions about eating disorders — for example, that eating disorders affect only females and not males. According to NEDA’s website, approximately 20 million women and 10 million men are affected by an eating disorder in their lifetime.“There’s a general stigma [that] people have a choice [on whether or not they have an eating disorder], but there are biological, genetic and environmental factors,” Schultz said. “It’s not something intrinsically wrong with the person.”According to NEDA’s website, eating disorders are mental illnesses and not lifestyle choices. In comparison with other mental disorders, anorexia has one of the highest mortality rates.Cullinan said there is a difference between exercising to maintain a healthy lifestyle and exercising to lose weight.“Exercise is great and part of a healthy lifestyle, but our focus is running to be healthy [to gain] cardiovascular benefits and not to lose weight,” Cullinan said.Schultz said the NEDA run helps promote this healthy mentality of exercise as a long-term investment as opposed to a short term weight-loss goal.“This happens every year and is solely for the point of raising awareness,” Schultz said. “We want the run to emphasize … that there is a huge support system here.”The run will begin with speeches about NEDA’s mission and end with all participants receiving free food such as Kind bars, fruit and Einstein Bros. products.The run will also promote awareness of resources for combatting eating disorders, including the University Counseling Center, Cullinan said.“We want this to be an open discussion. It’s not anything to be ashamed of,” Cullinan said. “[The run is] really just to raise awareness and [to say], if you have a friend, or if you yourself are struggling, get help.”last_img read more

Food and Pesticides

first_imgPesticide Action Network’s “What’s On My Food” website and iPhone app help consumers know specifically which pesticide residues are likely ending up on their foods (and in their bloodstreams). Photo Cred: Pesticide Action NetworkEarthTalk®E – The Environmental MagazineDear EarthTalk: How do I learn about what pesticides may be on the food I eat?                                                                                                             — Beatrice Olson, Cleveland, OHAlong with the rise in the popularity of organic food has come an increased awareness about the dangers lurking on so-called “conventionally produced” (that is, with chemical pesticides and fertilizers) foods.“There is a growing consensus in the scientific community that small doses of pesticides and other chemicals can have adverse effects on health, especially during vulnerable periods such as fetal development and childhood,” reports author and physician Andrew Weil, a leading voice for so-called integrative medicine combining conventional and alternative medical practices. He adds that keeping one’s family healthy isn’t the only reason to avoid foods produced using chemical inputs: “Pesticide and herbicide use contaminates groundwater, ruins soil structures and promotes erosion, and may be a contributor to ‘colony collapse disorder’, the sudden and mysterious die-off of pollinating honeybees that threatens the American food supply.”In general, fruits and vegetables with an outer layer of skin or rind that can be peeled and discarded are the safest in terms of pesticide residues. Most pesticides are sprayed on the outside of produce. So if you are going to toss the rind of that cantaloupe, you might as well save money and buy a conventional version. But a red pepper would be a different story: For those items consider it money well spent to go organic.The non-profit Environmental Working Group (EWG) lists a “dirty dozen” of fruits and vegetables with the highest pesticide load so that consumers know to look for organic varieties of them when possible. The dirty dozen are: apples, celery, strawberries, peaches, spinach, nectarines, grapes, sweet bell peppers, potatoes, blueberries, lettuce and kale/collard greens.Another non-profit working hard to raise awareness about pesticide residues on foods is the Pesticide Action Network (PAN). The group’s recently launched website and accompanying iPhone app called “What’s On My Food” helps consumers know specifically which pesticide residues are likely ending up on their foods (and in their bloodstreams). In creating the database, PAN linked pesticide food residue data with the toxicology for each chemical and made the combined information easily searchable. “Pesticides are a public health problem requiring public engagement to solve,” the group reports, adding that “What’s On My Food” can be an important tool in raising awareness.While the website version of “What’s On My Food” is helpful for advance planning, the iPhone app is handy while plying the supermarket produce aisles to help decide whether to go for organic vegetables or stick with the cheaper conventional ones. For instance, the database shows that conventionally grown collard greens likely contains residues of some 46 different chemicals including nine known/probable carcinogens, 25 suspected hormone disruptors, 10 neurotoxins and eight developmental/reproductive toxins—not to mention 25 different compounds known to be harmful to honeybees. Spending a little quality time on the website or app is enough to drive anyone to more organic food purchasing.CONTACTS: Andrew Weil, www.drweil.com; PAN, www.whatsonmyfood.org; EWG, www.ewg.org.EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine ( www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.last_img read more