The Armed Forces of Peru and Colombia Cooperate against Illegal Mining

first_imgThe basis of the agreement between Peru and Colombia is to stop an unlawful enterprise which accounts for huge revenues for organized crime groups in both nations. “This is a bilateral battle because we share the problems of terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal mining and others, and therefore we are coordinating the joint execution of our actions,” added Daniel Urresti, Peru’s Minister of Internal Affairs. Strategy includes help for civilian population In addition to calling for joint action by security forces against illegal miners, the treaty also seeks to promote sustainable economic activities, such as fish farming and the production of cacao in the border region, the Embassy of Colombia in Lima stated. Cacao production provides an alternative to the illegal cultivation of coca leaves for the purpose of producing cocaine. The Putumayo River is located along the border between Peru and Colombia. The two countries are divided by a continuous, 1,626 kilometer-long-long border. Organized crime groups generate about $29 billion from illegal mining annually in Peru, according to the Office of the Chairman of Peru’s Council of Ministers. This figure is 12 percent higher than the estimated annual revenue – about $25 billion – generated in Peru by drug trafficking. It also calls on Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to stop organized crime groups from smuggling the machinery needed to engage in illegal mining, according to the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Relations. The Armed Forces of the two countries are working cooperatively to carry out the Memorandum of Understanding they signed in February 2014. The agreement calls for Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to develop a strategy to fight illegal mining; to assess the environmental impact of such activity; to share information about such unlawful enterprises, and to carry out joint law enforcement operations to fight this crime. By Dialogo January 16, 2015 The governments of Peru and Colombia are working in cooperation along the border the two countries share to stop illegal mining and mitigate its impact on the environment. The Putumayo River is located along the border between Peru and Colombia. The two countries are divided by a continuous, 1,626 kilometer-long-long border. Illegal mining generates billions of dollars annually In Colombia, about 63 percent of all mining is conducted illegally, according to the Office of the Comptroller General. “The work along the Peru-Colombia border focuses on the Putumayo River basin, where we must meet the needs of the communities, finding a balance between human settlements and the environment,” Soto Castañola said. The agreement between the two countries warrants for a broad strategy of enforcement against illegal mining, protection of the ecosystem, and improved opportunities for communities that live in the border region. “In this partnership with Colombia, we have planned for actions against all acts that threaten the security, economy, natural resources, environment and health of our two nations stemming from illegal mining and related criminal offenses, such as trafficking in persons and forced child labor,” said Augusto Aníbal Soto Castañola, the High Commissioner for Mining Formalization in Peru. It also calls on Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to stop organized crime groups from smuggling the machinery needed to engage in illegal mining, according to the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Relations. center_img The basis of the agreement between Peru and Colombia is to stop an unlawful enterprise which accounts for huge revenues for organized crime groups in both nations. The agreement between the two countries warrants for a broad strategy of enforcement against illegal mining, protection of the ecosystem, and improved opportunities for communities that live in the border region. In addition to calling for joint action by security forces against illegal miners, the treaty also seeks to promote sustainable economic activities, such as fish farming and the production of cacao in the border region, the Embassy of Colombia in Lima stated. Cacao production provides an alternative to the illegal cultivation of coca leaves for the purpose of producing cocaine. “This is a bilateral battle because we share the problems of terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal mining and others, and therefore we are coordinating the joint execution of our actions,” added Daniel Urresti, Peru’s Minister of Internal Affairs. Annually, organized crime groups launder about $48.5 billion generated by illegal mining, according to a report titled, “Mining in Colombia, Institutionality and Territory, Paradoxes and Conflicts,” released by the Office of the Comptroller General. Strategy includes help for civilian population “The work along the Peru-Colombia border focuses on the Putumayo River basin, where we must meet the needs of the communities, finding a balance between human settlements and the environment,” Soto Castañola said. Illegal mining generates billions of dollars annually The Armed Forces of the two countries are working cooperatively to carry out the Memorandum of Understanding they signed in February 2014. The agreement calls for Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to develop a strategy to fight illegal mining; to assess the environmental impact of such activity; to share information about such unlawful enterprises, and to carry out joint law enforcement operations to fight this crime. Annually, organized crime groups launder about $48.5 billion generated by illegal mining, according to a report titled, “Mining in Colombia, Institutionality and Territory, Paradoxes and Conflicts,” released by the Office of the Comptroller General. In Colombia, about 63 percent of all mining is conducted illegally, according to the Office of the Comptroller General. Organized crime groups generate about $29 billion from illegal mining annually in Peru, according to the Office of the Chairman of Peru’s Council of Ministers. This figure is 12 percent higher than the estimated annual revenue – about $25 billion – generated in Peru by drug trafficking. The governments of Peru and Colombia are working in cooperation along the border the two countries share to stop illegal mining and mitigate its impact on the environment. “In this partnership with Colombia, we have planned for actions against all acts that threaten the security, economy, natural resources, environment and health of our two nations stemming from illegal mining and related criminal offenses, such as trafficking in persons and forced child labor,” said Augusto Aníbal Soto Castañola, the High Commissioner for Mining Formalization in Peru. It’s so good to be a reservist in the military forces, I didn’t last 20 years in our dear and beloved COLOMBIAN AIR FORCE in vain… Don’t shut the mines down on the miners. Let them work, or give them the food they work for so they may eat I didn’t like it Well, truly, how could we not thank those who have helped us so much. Before we’d travel on mules because we had no roads, thanks to this valuable help the roads were opened up and along with this came automobiles, the beginning of development for any civilization. And so, thousands of other things.last_img read more

Moyes eulogises about Giggs

first_imgDavid Moyes jokingly suggested Ryan Giggs’ Manchester United team-mates might be trying to usher him out of the players’ dressing room by buying him a coach’s watch for his 40th birthday. Press Association And given Giggs’ outstanding contribution to Wednesday’s 5-0 hammering of Bayer Leverkusen, it is unlikely the United squad would want to be without the man who has now played an incredible 953 games for the Red Devils. “When I came I expected to see someone who must be dropping off, must be fading,” said Moyes. “I thought it would be obvious and I heard a lot of pundits thinking that as well. “I came with the idea that maybe he is not quite the same. “But I can honestly say he has been fantastic. “For Ryan to be playing so well at his age is terrific and a great example to young players about how you should dedicate yourself throughout your career. “Also to players who get into their early to mid-30s and think things are coming to an end it shows if you really look after yourself and train well, you can go on for a lot longer.” One of Moyes’ first decisions after replacing Sir Alex Ferguson in the summer was to appoint Giggs to his coaching team. He does make a contribution behind the scenes. But once training starts, he is in the thick of it, not on the outside watching, exactly as it has to be. “When you get older you have to train as hard as the young ones,” said Moyes. “He has been great for me. I have used him to settle into my job. “He is involved in all the stuff we do regarding the team but once we have decided what we are doing, and who is doing what, he will go and train with the players, just as he has done for the past 20 years.” In his wide-ranging discussions with Ferguson before his own appointment was confirmed, it was suggested to Moyes that Giggs would come into his own a few months into the campaign, when the pitches became softer. It was a point reinforced by the man himself on his first encounter with Moyes in the summer. The reality turned into something completely different. “I knew Ryan would be the dictator of it,” said Moyes. “He said he took a bit longer to get ready and didn’t tend to start the season. “But he played a lot of pre-season. I felt he was ready to start and we needed him. He has shown he was capable of that.” Giggs’ overall contribution has been remarkable. He may still be waiting for the Premier League goal that would extend his record of scoring in every season the competition has existed but few would bet against it happening at some point. And Giggs remains the man most likely to keep his cool in the maelstrom of an important game and deliver the right pass at exactly the right time. “We always have a discussion about when is the best time to use him and we also get a feel from him,” said Moyes. “Last Saturday, before we went to Cardiff, he was fantastic in training and if I had my way I would have played him. “One of his presents was a coach’s watch – I think they are beginning to think about pushing him out of the dressing room. “It is not a problem for him to play in two or three games but I had it in my mind Marouane Fellaini was suspended for the European game and I didn’t want to risk Ryan so quickly.” That suggests Giggs will not start at Tottenham on Sunday at the White Hart Lane ground where he confirmed his class with a sensational solo goal in 1992, when he was only 18. He has gone on to become the most decorated player in English football history, setting records it is impossible to imagine will ever be matched. “He’s undoubtedly at the top,” said Moyes, of Giggs’ standing in the modern game. And as for the future, bearing in mind speculation is already starting over an additional year’s contract extension. “When you get to this age you wait until the end of the season before making a decision,” said Moyes. “It is based on how you feel, how you have done over the year and what your body is telling you. “There are no quick decisions.” The Scot also admitted when he arrived at Old Trafford he expected to find a fading force in the veteran Welshman, no longer capable of having an impact, as so many critics have suggested down the years. Moyes accepts he could not have been more wrong. last_img read more

USC Hosts Annual TEDxTrousdale event

first_imgStudents gathered at the Caruso Catholic Center on Saturday for the second annual TEDxTrousdale event, an independently organized, student-run conference dedicated to providing students with the opportunity to collaborate and exchange ideas.‘How to experiment’ · Raghav Bashyal, a senior majoring in interactive entertainment, was one of the seven TedxTrousdale student speakers. The event took place on Saturday. – Austin Vogel | Daily TrojanTED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas that range from science to business. The series of talks are events run independently in communities on a local scale. This year, the conference was held by the Academic Culture Assembly division of Undergraduate Student Government’s Program Board.Jasmine McAllister and Erin Limlingan, the co-executive directors of the Academic Culture Assembly, were responsible for organizing the event along with a team of eight others.“If there’s anything I want to emphasize, it’s that this event is completely student-organized and student-funded,” McAllister said.The seven speakers for the conference were all USC students who were chosen from over 30 applicants by conference organizers in a blind application process. TED restricts the number of attendees for its affiliated events, so approximately 100 attendees also had to be selected by an application process to attend the event, McAllister said.The speakers at the event included six undergraduate students and one graduate student. They included Zade Shakir, a senior majoring in international relations and biological sciences; Dru Erridge, a senior majoring in computer science (game design); Catherine Uong, a senior majoring in East Asian languages and cultures and business administration; Raghav Bashyal, a senior majoring in interactive entertainment; Eugene Lee, a senior majoring in architecture and Paulina Shahery, a senior majoring in architecture.The theme of the conference was “Breaking New Ground,” and attendees were given notepads and encouraged to write and share their ideas during breaks.Shakir was the first speaker of the day with his talk, titled, “Lessons from a Four-Year-Old Superhero.” He discussed his experience at Spirits in Action, a nonprofit organization that hosts USC’s version of the Special Olympics for developmentally-disabled youth, and how it inspired him to start Kicks for Kids, an organization that provides a healthy and active lifestyle for children with special needs who are often excluded from regular involvement in organized sports.“Regardless of the future that I pursue, it’s going to be helping those that don’t have the access I was privileged to have,” he said.The event progressed with a talk by Erridge, who spoke of the importance of innovation even in the face of difficulties.“It seems to me whenever people look at hardships, all they think about is what they can do when they get out of them,” Erridge said. “But if I look at the people I admire in the world — the technology innovators like Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak or Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg — they made their impact right where they were at.”Bashyal emphasized the importance of challenging the mind in his talk, “How to Experiment: A Millennial’s Guide.”“Think about when you’re in class, and you’re bored. There’s no Facebook or your phone to distract you, and the professor sure as hell isn’t going to distract you,” he said. “So what do you do? You start to daydream, your mind starts to entertain you. Daydreams are great places for ideas to grow.”The event also included a surprise appearance by Ron Finley, a speaker at an official TED conference last year. He is a local, self-titled “gangster gardener” who advocates that people grow their own food as a form of defiance and for nutritional reasons in South Los Angeles, an area dominated by fast-food chains.He gave an example of his ideal neighborhood garden.“Now I know that I can send my son to your garden and get some onions, and you can send your daughter to mine and get some apples off the tree,” he said.Shahery discussed the importance of being aware when going from destination to destination. She explained how she challenged herself to avoid using her cellphone when walking from place to place and how that related to the concept of deliberate irregularities.“The paths in a Japanese tea garden have regular irregularities,” Shahery said. “Each rock is tilted so that we deliberately place our heels, then our toes, on the rock, step-by-step. This means that our attention comes back to the physical placement of our foot rather than letting our minds wander.”Those in attendance appreciated the collaborative nature of the event.Aseem Afsah, a freshman in the World Bachelors in Business program, said that he appreciated hearing the ideas of those more experienced.“I feel like being a freshman, you don’t really get exposure to a lot of upperclassmen, besides through extracurriculars,” Afsah said. “So I think being able to see people who are about to graduate soon and see their ideas has been pretty cool so far.”Rona Sheen, a freshman majoring in business administration, also appreciated the topics of the talks.“I really liked how the first two were about how to get your ideas and ‘don’t be afraid of failure,’” Sheen said. “I liked the fourth talk Eugene Lee gave about the digital printing because I just felt his story was really personal, and it was very introspective into how he actually failed and went through that process — I really liked that.”last_img read more