Journalists and media threatened on all sides

first_img News Follow the news on Iraq to go further Organisation Parker was threatened on Facebook and on Al-Ahd TV ¬– a TV station owned by Asaib Ahl al-Haq, an armed group backed by Iran – in connection with a 3 April article about human rights violations by Iraqi police and allied Shiite militias in Tikrit after its liberation from Islamic State.It described a climate of violence, looting and impunity, with police torturing a suspected Islamic State member to death and Shiite militiamen dragging a man’s body behind their car, and suggested that this would have dire consequences for the government’s strategy for combatting the jihadists.Reporters Without Borders urges the government to guarantee better protection for journalists who are targeted either by Islamic State or radical Shiite militias.“The Iraqi authorities must not allow crimes against journalists to go unpunished,” Reporters Without Borders deputy programme director Virginie Dangles said. “When journalists are the targets of threats and violence, investigations must be carried out to identify and punish those responsible. The authorities have a duty to protect journalists, who are not safe anywhere in Iraq.”Reacting to the Reuters bureau chief’s departure, Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar Al-Abadi reaffirmed his support for journalists and the news media and claimed that the police did everything possible to protect Parker after the threats. He also ordered government forces to end the looting and arrest those responsible.Two-fold pressureAs violence and impunity continue to reign in Iraq, journalists are still being harassed by officials who refuse to accept criticism and do not hesitate to bring judicial proceedings against them.According to the Journalistic Freedoms Observatory, a Reporters Without Borders partner organization, the authorities in the southern province of Basra are prosecuting freelance journalist Nasser Al-Hajjaj for criticizing the governor on social networks. The head of the Supreme Islamic Council has asked the governor to withdraw his complaint. Al-Hajjaj is currently in Lebanon.Reporters Without Borders and JFO wrote a joint letter to the Supreme Council of the Judiciary, the Baghdad Court of Appeal and the Court for Press and Publication Cases in February 2014 drawing attention to the way many government officials and politicians abuse the possibility of bringing legal proceedings in order to sabotage the work of journalists.Iraq is ranked 156th out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. Reporters Without Borders is concerned about journalists in Iraq being hounded in connection with their reporting after Reuters Baghdad bureau chief Ned Parker had to flee the country because of threats by Shiite armed groups over his coverage of their behaviour in the newly liberated city of Tikrit. February 15, 2021 Find out more RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” RSF_en Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan Receive email alerts April 18, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalists and media threatened on all sides News News News Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” IraqMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information December 28, 2020 Find out more IraqMiddle East – North Africa December 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Faculty, staff speak on the ‘Cost of Silence’ on college campuses

first_imgMembers of the Notre Dame faculty and administration discussed their experiences with diversity and how the Notre Dame community might encourage it on campus during the Cost of Silence Faculty and Staff panel Thursday night.Timothy Matovina, the chair of the theology department and former co-director of the Institute of Latino Studies, said people should not make assumptions about others, especially Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students and Latino students.“Don’t presume because someone is here from a certain background that they’re a diversity admit or that they have a lower SAT score than everyone else,” he said. “ … In my experience, they achieved at the very highest levels at the schools they’re in, which is our policy.”Matovina also said students should consider the implications of politics on some students’ personal lives, especially in light of last year’s national election.“The political is very personal,” he said. “ … [Students who came to talk to him] had no idea what the repercussions would be, and there’s still a tremendous fear. It wasn’t just a matter of political disagreement.”Brian Collier, the director of the American Indian Catholic Schools Network, said disrespecting Native Americans and their culture is not something of the past, as evidenced by two students dressing as Native Americans for their Halloween costumes during a football game this season. The students’ costumes included the headdress that is a religious symbol in some cultures, Collier said.“It’s not that people want trouble,” he said. “People don’t want their religious symbols appropriated.”Collier also said students should say something whenever they see someone misusing a culture’s symbols.For the LGBT community, Sara Agostinelli, the assistant director for LGBTQ Initiatives at the Gender Relations Center, said things are “just okay” for LGBT students on campus.“Something I hear a lot is that here at Notre Dame students feel very tolerated,” she said. “There’s not these daily acts of hate or things we might see at other institutions across the country, but there’s not a sense of welcoming, embrace and celebration.”To remedy this problem, Agostinelli recommended that students recognize the importance of allies and to reach out to students to check in on how they are doing, especially when hateful acts happen on other campuses.For an admissions perspective, Don Bishop, the associate vice president of undergraduate enrollment, said Notre Dame has made great strides in becoming more diverse due to new recruiting tactics. These tactics, Bishop said, include expanding the spring visitation program, going to new schools and working with community-based organizations.“Rather than waiting for kids to instantly know enough about Notre Dame and apply, we’re trying to go out and seek them and get a conversation with them,” he said.As a result of these efforts, Bishop said Notre Dame is on par with diversity with the average of the top 30 most selective private institutions in the U.S. He said the only categories in which Notre Dame falls behind is with Asian Americans and international students.Mary Galvin, the William K. Warren Foundation dean of the College of Science, spoke about her personal experiences. Though she is an accomplished scientist who has a Ph.D. from MIT, she said she oftentimes felt stupid since a third-grade teacher had told her parents she “wasn’t college material.”Due to her background, Galvin said she understands that many students who come to Notre Dame from schools that may not have offered AP science classes may begin to feel they are falling behind in their science and engineering courses. She said students must share their experiences with others to help them not feel bad about themselves.“If you went through the struggle of not thinking you were smart but then got out of it, be willing to talk about it,” she said.Jay Caponigro, the director of community engagement in the Office of Public Affairs, said to help solve social issues today, students must build relationships with others. To develop these partnerships, Caponigro said you must listen to people and ask them about their stories, especially by asking the question, “Why?” Caponigro also said allies must teach others to do things for themselves as well.“An ally isn’t someone who just does stuff for other people,” he said.Tags: allyship, Cost of Silence, DACA, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, LGBT, racelast_img read more

Securing longer-term deposits with IRAs

first_imgAs credit unions continue to seek ways to increase their member count and make capital available to those members, they often overlook a key source of longer-term deposits: IRAs. By taking a generational approach to the opportunities that IRAs provide, credit unions can expand their deposit base.Millennial ApproachMillennials are good savers and are looking for financial services that they trust and that serve a worthwhile purpose. Credit unions can attract these younger savers by making educational modules about saving with an IRA available on their websites, as well as other outlets, like YouTube. And while millennials are likely to establish an account online, they are just as likely to visit a credit union branch directly, if inclined to do so. Credit unions should have a strong online new account set-up process, but also be prepared for in-person visits. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more